Category Archives: fofabvlic

First Tuesday to highlight dot org start-ups

“New media developments have given charities the opportunity to achieve their goals more effectively,” say new media networking organisation First Tuesday. They point to Amnesty International’s adaptation of WAP technology to its mass-petitioning of governments over human rights issues as an example“New media developments have given charities the opportunity to achieve their goals more effectively,” say new media networking organisation First Tuesday. They point to Amnesty International’s adaptation of WAP technology to its mass-petitioning of governments over human rights issues as an example.“Charities should be implementing the entrepreneurialism demonstrated by new economy businesses,” they advise. First Tuesday co-founder John Browning says, “New-economy business plans often include vital targets for building communities, so conversely, community-builders such as charities should adjust to the new business climate.” Advertisement First Tuesday to highlight dot org start-ups AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 28 November 2000 | News As a result of this interest in charities’ use of the Internet, First Tuesday is holding a special event on the subject in London on Tuesday 5th December.Speakers include The Samaritans on the benefits of email counselling, FaxYourMP.com on making your voice heard in Parliament, AMREF on bringing health education to Africa, Madopolis on charity and brand-building, Happy Computers on effective social intervention from small business, Oven Digital on proposing a portal and community for foster carers, Helpsmile on marketing charities online, and Youreable.com on how new media can make markets work for the disabled.Find out more from First Tuesday. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

A Hand Up: Black Philanthropy and Self-help in America

first_img Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy A Hand Up: Black Philanthropy and Self-help in America Howard Lake | 16 July 2008 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Rock ‘n’ Roll Liverpool Marathon partners with everydayhero for online fundraising

first_img Howard Lake | 2 May 2015 | News The Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon SeriesRock-n-Roll Liverpool Marathon runners 2014.The Rock ‘n’ Roll Liverpool Marathon is part of an international race series combining entertainment and running, featuring live bands at every mile along the course, cheerleaders encouraging runners throughout the race, and a post-event headliner concert. This is the second year for the Liverpool event, where around 10,000 participants are expected to take part over race weekend including a family fun run, a 5k, a marathon or a half marathon.John Bird of everydayhero commented:“Combining music and running in this way makes the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon series a really unique and fun event to take part in. Through this partnership we hope to be setting it apart even further and making it a really positive fundraising experience. When runners create their personal fundraising page for the event, through an integration with MapMyFitness app, they will be able to track not only the money they’ve raised for their favourite charity but also the training hours, miles and even calories they’ve put into their training – in other words, everything counts – so we count it!”Competitor Group’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series is the ‘World’s Largest Running Series’ with more than 500,000 runners taking part in festival events around the world every year. In the 18 years since it was founded, the Series has helped raise more than $310 million through the events for a variety of worthy causes. Tagged with: Blackbaud Digital Events everyday hero  48 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Competitor Group, Inc. (CGI), the organiser of the Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon Series, has selected fundraising platform everydayhero as its partner for two years for the Rock ‘n’ Roll Liverpool Marathon and Half Marathon. This year’s event takes place on 13-14 June 2015.Rob Griffiths, Race Director for the two events, explained why those chose everydayhero.He said:“We encourage our participants to raise money for charity, including Liverpool’s featured charities Cancer Research UK and The Clatterbridge Cancer Charity. However, a challenge these charities have historically faced is how to urge registrants to start fundraising once they have signed up for the event.“With everydayhero onboard, we aim to further support our featured charities and help registrants get personal fundraising pages up and running instantly as part of the registration process. Together, we will be able to offer the ultimate running experience for fundraisers, both leading up to the event and during the Rock ‘n’ Rollweekend.”Everydayhero’s integration makes it simple for participants to select a charity, set a fundraising goal and create their own fundraising webpage on which friends and family can donate, and to track their fundraising progress. Advertisementcenter_img Rock ‘n’ Roll Liverpool Marathon partners with everydayhero for online fundraising About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Anti-fascist rebellion in Ukraine and Donbass

first_imgGreg ButterfieldWW photo: G. DunkelFrom the talk given by Greg Butterfield at the 2014 Workers World Party National Conference in New York CityA year ago, few people in the U.S. — including us — were thinking about Ukraine. But one group was: the imperialist ruling class. The 1% and their Pentagon enforcers had been not only thinking about the former Soviet republic, but pouring in money — to the tune of $5 billion, by their own admission — to foment a coup and open up the possibility of NATO expansion to Russia’s western border.Last November, a movement protesting Kiev’s government began in Maidan Square in Kiev, Ukraine’s capital. The Western media and U.S. officials loudly supported it, the first indication that something was amiss. These protests, allegedly for democracy and against corruption, demanded an association agreement with the European Union that would open Ukraine’s markets to the West while cutting economic ties with Russia and its Customs Union.The neoliberal character of the movement was clear. In December, its fascist component took center stage as demonstrators destroyed monuments to V.I. Lenin and the Soviet Red Army. Republican Sen. John McCain flew to Kiev and stood beside Oleh Tyahnybok, an open neo-Nazi.Last February, the elected bourgeois government was toppled. Oligarchs assumed direct control of the state and neo-Nazi gangs terrorized the streets. The Obama administration immediately pledged $10 billion in assistance to the new regime and sent John Kerry to hand over the first billion personally.It seemed that Washington had successfully carried out another so-called color revolution — actually a counterrevolution.But then something unexpected happened. An anti-fascist rebellion rooted in the working class began in eastern Ukraine. What started as a protest by the region’s mostly Russian-speaking population against the new regime’s ban on the Russian language developed into a full-fledged armed struggle against NATO expansion, austerity and neo-Nazi terror.What’s more, it took place in a former Soviet republic shattered by capitalist counterrevolution only a generation ago. For the first time in 20 years, discussion of genuine revolution — workers’ revolution for socialism — was back on the agenda in the newly proclaimed People’s Republics of Donetsk and Lugansk, as well as other areas of Eastern Ukraine still occupied by the Kiev regime.The shock waves of this rebellion in the industrial and mining region of Donbass were felt throughout the Russian Federation and the former Soviet Union. A resurgence of Soviet patriotism and anti-fascist sentiment pushed the bourgeois government in Moscow to stand up for the existence of the people’s republics, in however flawed and contradictory ways.The effects continue to ripple outward across Europe, where the remembrance of Nazism and fascist occupation remains deeply rooted in the working class. And from the anti-fascist movement in Spain it has spread to Latin America as well. Today, young leftists from Russia, China, Greece, Spain and Brazil, inspired by the international brigades of the Spanish Civil War, have joined the people’s militias fighting fascism in the Donbass.While the resistance is inspiring, the toll of the U.S.-backed coup in Ukraine is enormous. Over 10,000 have been killed in the regime’s so-called anti-terrorist operation, tens of thousands more wounded, hundreds of thousands made refugees, homes, schools, hospitals and factories destroyed. At least 48 anti-fascists were slaughtered in the neo-Nazi siege of the Odessa House of Trade Unions building last May 2, hundreds more imprisoned or driven into exile.The constant ratcheting up of war propaganda by the U.S. and NATO against Russia threatens to tip the world into a new global conflict as Wall Street pursues one of its major strategic goals: the destruction of Russia as an independent capitalist rival outside of U.S. control.This week, we’ve seen another major escalation in U.S./NATO war rhetoric as Kiev prepares for a new military offensive against Donbass. The coming months will likely see an increasing class struggle unfold within the people’s republics over their future direction — whether into the orbit of capitalist Russia or in the direction of revolutionary socialism.Workers World Party stands firmly in solidarity with the Donbass People’s Republics and the anti-fascist resistance in Ukraine. We demand an end to the repression against Union Borotba, the Communist Party of Ukraine, and other popular organizations and workers’ movements targeted by the coup regime and its neo-Nazi enforcers.Together with our allies in the International Action Center and the United National Antiwar Coalition, we will continue our work to educate the anti-war and workers’ movement and take action to demand: No NATO expansion! Hands off Donbass and Russia! U.S. out of Ukraine!FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

[CBI v CBI] AK Bassi Withdraws Plea Challenging Transfer Order By Nageshwar Rao As SC Refuses To Interfere [Read Order]

first_imgTop Stories[CBI v CBI] AK Bassi Withdraws Plea Challenging Transfer Order By Nageshwar Rao As SC Refuses To Interfere [Read Order] Nilashish Chaudhary28 July 2020 1:52 AMShare This – xOn Tuesday, Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) officer, AK Bassi withdrew his petition challenging his transfer to Port Blair ordered by then interim Director, Nageshwar Rao on January 11, 2019, as the Supreme Court refused to interfere in the matter. The Bench comprising of CJI SA Bobde along with Justices AS Bopanna and V Ramasubramanian however, granted Bassi liberty to approach…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginOn Tuesday, Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) officer, AK Bassi withdrew his petition challenging his transfer to Port Blair ordered by then interim Director, Nageshwar Rao on January 11, 2019, as the Supreme Court refused to interfere in the matter. The Bench comprising of CJI SA Bobde along with Justices AS Bopanna and V Ramasubramanian however, granted Bassi liberty to approach the appropriate authority with regard to his grievance. During the hearing CJI Bobde expressed surprise at the fact that Bassi had not joined his post in the Andamans, despite orders. Appearing for the CBI officer, senior advocate Rajeev Dhavan submitted that his transfer was wrongly ordered. Referring to the Supreme Court’s order of January 8, 2019, Dhavan apprised the Court that pursuant to the same, his transfer was withdrawn. The Court had granted him permission to file a representation and sort out the issue with the CBI, added Dhavan. However, Dhavan continued, Nageshwar Rao again took charge as interim Director on the night of January 10 again and restored the order. “The Order for transfer to Port Blair was wrong, and had been withdrawn in pursuance to an order of this Court. This should have been the end of the issue ideally. But a new director came in his place, restoring the transfer order”, submitted the senior advocate. The CJI, however, was of the opinion that even if Bassi believed that the Order was illegal, it had to be followed unless it was set aside by Court. “Even if that order is illegal, it has to be set aside. Where is the order saying we hold the transfer order as illegal?”, he remarked. Averring to the Supreme Court Order referred to by Dhavan, the CJI added that “in our own order, we do not see any protection to you. What has prevented you from joining your post?” Dhavan again referred to the Apex Court order to argue that he had immediately moved Court for relief as the transfer order came despite him being allowed to take up the issue with the CBI. “This (transfer) order is in the teeth of fulfillment of the Courts Order”, said Dhavan while urging the Court to look into the alleged mala fide intentions behind the transfer and grant him protection. As the Solicitor General, Tushar Mehta suggested that the transfer Order should be challenged before an appropriate forum, Dhavan said that he would approach the Central Administrative Tribunal, but sought to be protected against the chargesheet. Dhavan informed Court that the chargesheet filed against Bassi even raised allegations as to why he moved the Top Court with this plea without seeking permission from the agency. “I’m being harassed for approaching court. I’ll go to CAT, but kindly protect me till then from this chargesheet”, requested Dhavan. However, no such relief was granted by the CJI, who allowed Dhavan to withdraw his plea with leave to keep all grounds open before an appropriate forum. BACKGROUND Immediately after taking charge of the CBI, following the controversial removal of then CBI Director Alok Verma on October 23, 2018, Rao had transferred Bassi to Port Blair on October 24. After the Apex Court set aside Verma’s removal, he took charge as Director again on January 10, 2019 and revoked Bassi’s transfer order. In the same order, dated January 8, the Court had also granted Bassi liberty to make a representation before officials regarding his transfer. However, consequent to a meeting of the High Power Committee headed by the Prime Minister, Verma was ousted from office again on the night of January 10 itself, and interim charge was given back to Rao, who again transferred Bassi to Port Blair. Bassi, who was the former Investigation Officer in the FIR against Rakesh Asthana immediately moved the Top Court challenging his transfer as mala fide. He contended that he was being victimized by Rao, who represented a faction of the CBI that didn’t want a free and fair probe against Asthana. On January 31, 2019 the matter had been taken up wherein the Supreme Court had sought CBI’s response.Click Here To Download Order[Read Order] Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

SC Allows CLAT 2020 Aspirants To Make Representation Before Grievance Redressal Committee Within Two Days; Committee To Decide At The Earliest [Read Order]

first_imgTop StoriesSC Allows CLAT 2020 Aspirants To Make Representation Before Grievance Redressal Committee Within Two Days; Committee To Decide At The Earliest [Read Order] Sanya Talwar9 Oct 2020 12:19 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court on Friday allowed CLAT 2020 aspirants, liberty to make representation(s) before the Grievance Redressal Committee which is headed by Retired Chief Justice of India regarding their grievances pertaining to the conduct of the Examination.A bench headed by Justice Ashok Bhushan stated that the Committee should take a decision at the earliest on the objections raised…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court on Friday allowed CLAT 2020 aspirants, liberty to make representation(s) before the Grievance Redressal Committee which is headed by Retired Chief Justice of India regarding their grievances pertaining to the conduct of the Examination.A bench headed by Justice Ashok Bhushan stated that the Committee should take a decision at the earliest on the objections raised by aspirants.The bench however, refused to pass interim orders and declined to stay the counselling and admissions process.Today, Senior Advocate Gopal Sankaranarayan appeared for CLAT2020 aspirant(s) and submitted before the top court that the manner in which the examination was conducted caused inconveniences to students such as being unable to feed in the right answers, wrong model answers for questions and markings. The Court was hearing a writ Petition seeking a direction to National Law School Consortium to re-conduct the Common Law Admission Test 2020(Lavanya Gupta and others vs Consortium of National Law Universities and others).Sankaranarayan informed the Court that 40,000 objections came regarding questions and answers. “They have given wrong answers and wrong questions. On 19,000 objections, there is no response from them,” he said.On the issue of software glitches, the Senior Advocate stated that there had been a software defect which had led to a situation that has never happened before.”The cut off in this exam is not even 0 but -4!”, he said.Senior Advocate PS Narsimha appearing for the NLU Consortium on the other hand submitted that there was a misconception that those with minus marks had been called for counselling and that it was important to call students because an unending exercise for counselling could not take place in light of the pandemic situation.Further, he added that the CLAT 2020 exercise was an extraordinary one with audits of every student who took the exam available to them.Referring to an affidavit filed by an aspirant, Narsimha said, “the document which has been filed stipulating marks and attempted answers by the aspirant here is fraudulent. Further, I want to add the number of questions have reduced since last year.”In this context, the bench disposed off the plea with liberty to aspirants to approach the Grievance Redressal Committee, stating that their grievances shall be taken up at the earliest.Sankaranarayan at this juncture told the Court that the Counselling etc. must not be wrapped up in the meanwhile but the bench refused to put a stay on the same, stating that the processes were to finish by October 15.The Petition was filed by Five CLAT 2020 aspirants submitted that “CLAT 2020‟ is erroneous, faulty, defective & discriminatory and violative of Articles 14 & 15 of the Constitution of India.As per the Petition ‘CLAT 2020‟ in peculiar circumstances wherein results declared by the Consortium of NLU, are totally wrong, incorrect, erroneous and therefore, biased due to following reasons:-1. The candidates have chosen/selected/ticked correct answers; however, it is reflecting in result that wrong & different options have been chosen/selected/ticked.2. The result is displaying and calculating marks in those questions, which were not even attempted by the candidates.3. Candidates have chosen/selected/ticked different options; however, in result different answers are shown as chosen/selected/ticked.4. 10 questions are either itself wrong, or their answers which are uploaded on website are wrong.It is also submitted that the Consortium of National Law University issued press release on 3rd October 2020 in very arrogant way, stating therein that large number of objections are filed because CLAT-2020 had made filing of objections absolutely free, however, other institutions charge Rs. 1,000/- per objection.Further, that Consortium issued a notification dated 03.10.2020 on Modifications in the Questions and Answers wherein they dropped the questions no. 146, 147 & 150 and modified the answers key for questions no. 08, 35 & 148. Therefore, neither grievance committee nor the consortium looked into the issues of objections / grievances filed by the petitioners / aspirants in large numbers, however, dealt the same with biased approach in very arrogant way.It is also submitted that some students comes from non-English background, therefore, such a debauched focus on English reading and comprehension skill has a disproportionate impact on these students. This clearly renders CLAT 2020 discriminatory and violate of Articles 14 and 15; and on this ground alone, the exam ought to be quashed as arbitrary and violative of Article 14 of the Constitution.’Many questions in “CLAT 2020‟ were formed in such a way that all four options were not the actual answers according to the questions, for example, question no‟s 146 to 150. Further, the wrong answers were provided in the answer key for several questions, e.g. questions 5, 6, 8, 14, 16, 19, 35, 45, 103, 122 and 125 (From the English, Logical Reasoning and Legal Reasoning sections). Apart from that, many questions had more than one right answers, so instead of choosing correct answers the candidates were trying to guess “most appropriate” option”.It is also submitted that several other questions were of such a standard that even seasoned practicing lawyers would need to do extensive legal research before attempting to answer them, and even after such research no objective answer could be given to these questions. These questions were based on opinion rather than based upon study and knowledge, hence should not have been included in such “objective” type examinationClick Here To Download Order[Read Order]Next Storylast_img read more

PSNI arrest man in possession of drugs on Foyle Bridge

first_img Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Police in Derry have seized suspected drugs and made an arrest after a vehicle was stopped on the Foyle Bridge last night.Suspected Class B drugs, namely cannabis, with an estimated street value of £1,200, were seized after vehicle was stopped on the Foyle Bridge last night at around 8:20pm.The driver of the vehicle, a 21-year-old man, was arrested on suspicion of offences, including possession of a Class B controlled drug, possession of a Class B controlled drug with intent to supply and using a motor vehicle without insurance, and he remains in custody this morning assisting with enquiries.A follow-up search of a property in the Drumahoe area resulted in the seizure of suspected Class A and Class C controlled drugs.Inspector Gareth Lavery said: “Drugs have no place in our city. Drugs ruin lives, and those involved can expect to feel the full force of the law.”Anyone with information about drugs, or any other criminal activity in your neighbourhood, is asked to contact Police on 101. Facebook PSNI arrest man in possession of drugs on Foyle Bridge Google+ Pinterest WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter By News Highland – April 11, 2021 center_img Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleTD claims people in the North-West not being vaccinated the same as othersNext articleHealth officials urge compliance as restrictions begin to ease tomorrow News Highland Homepage BannerNews Twitter Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

US women’s soccer star Jessica McDonald has joyful reunion at World Cup

first_imgWelcome to France, son!!! #FWWC2019 #HesHere pic.twitter.com/JYwjbxeMv9— Jessica McDonald (@J_Mac1422) June 26, 2019“I want him to be proud of his mom,” McDonald said in her USWNT bio.McDonald and the rest of Team USA will play France on Friday at 3 p.m. EST, in Paris.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailEric Verhoeven/Soccrates/Getty Images(PARIS) — U.S. women’s soccer star Jessica McDonald will have an extra special supporter in the stands Friday when Team USA takes on France in their highly-anticipated World Cup quarterfinal.McDonald, one of only a handful of moms among the 552 players in the World Cup, was reunited with her son, Jeremiah, 7, Wednesday in France.The U.S. Women’s National Team star shared a video on Twitter of Jeremiah shrieking, running toward her and then giving his mom a long, giant hug. Beau Lund June 27, 2019 /Sports News – National US women’s soccer star Jessica McDonald has joyful reunion at World Cuplast_img read more

Former USI standout Jordan makes strong Olympic Trials push

first_imgIf Jordan qualifies and competes at the U.S. Olympic Trials, which are July 1-10 in Eugene, Oregon, he will become the third former USI Men’s Cross Country/Track & Field All-American to compete at a U.S. Olympic Trials event in the last six months. The two-time steeplechase All-American finished third in the event at the 2013 NCAA Division II Outdoor Championships and sixth at the 2012 NCAA II Outdoor Championships. He posted a school-record time of 8:42.63 at the 2013 Payton Jordan Invitational. Jordan, competing for the New Jersey-New York Track Club, finished 17th in the 3,000-meter steeplechase at the Hoka One One Middle Distance Classic in Eagle Rock, California. His time of eight minutes, 35.47 seconds was just 3.47 seconds away from a U.S. Olympic Trials automatic qualifying time and ranks him 14th in the U.S. in 2016 and 66th in the world. Former University of Southern Indiana Men’s Cross Country/Track & Field All-American Michael Jordan ’15 (Indianapolis, Indiana) made a strong push for a spot in the upcoming U.S. Olympic Trials Friday night. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharecenter_img This past February, Jesse Davis ’06 (Bloomington, Indiana) and Dustin Emerick ’12 (Elmwood, Illinois) competed in the U.S. Olympic Trials marathon in Los Angeles. Emerick finished 26th in the event, crossing the finish line in 2:22:18, while Davis was 70th with a time of 2:29:39. A five-time All-American at USI, Jordan owns the top three times in school history in the steeplechase. He was the 2012 GLVC Cross Country Runner of the Year before earning U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches’ Association Midwest Region Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year honors in 2013. Jordan graduated from USI in 2015 with a bachelor’s degree in psychology.last_img read more

Speech: First Sea Lord speech at the RUSI Sea Power Conference

first_imgIt was hard to know where to start when you think about how to conclude this conference such a valuable day of debate on the future of Naval Warfare.And while I was thinking about what words to use and where to draw inspiration from and I promise you this is true I was looking through the latest RUSI Journal. And came across an excellent review by Christian Melby of Lawrence Freedman’s new book The Future of War: A History. And that title struck a chord because of what we’re talking about today.Now I’ll confess straight up that I haven’t yet read Lawrence Freedman’s book, more often than not these days in this job I spend most of my time outside of leave periods reading briefs and papers rather than reading interesting books. But I will try to read it in due course.But the review was excellent. And if it’s accurate, then the approach that Lawrence is taking in that book is not just what the future is, but how to look at it. And I think that offers real food for thought to how we try to culminate our work here today.The key theme is that the study of war should not be separated from the context of what you’re looking at the ‘concerns of the time’ as he calls it in which a war occurs.Nor can we constrain ourselves to the facts and figures of war, so often the focus of analysis over the last century. Attempts to quantify and measure wars will perhaps never quite tell the entire picture of the conflict.The world of fiction can make the point really well. The 2015 novel Ghost Fleet: A Novel of the Next World War demonstrates that a rigorously researched story can actually prove sufficiently thought provoking such that it can help to prevent the war it describes. A powerful piece of modern deterrence.By focussing on the issue of context, Freedman managed to steer clear of predicting the incidence and form of future wars. And I think that’s the key component of today it struck me that his reminder to us is not to try and do that.So maybe instead of trying to predict the incidence and form of future conflicts, maybe it’s better instead to consider the context of the maritime environment in 2035, a context that will provide the setting in which future naval warfare may be conducted. So that’s what I’ll try and do.We’ve heard today already about the well-established importance of seaborne trade which dominates our country’s economy today and shows every prospect of doing so out into the future. And not just for us but for all maritime nations. 90% of all intercontinental and regional trade by volume; with an estimated global value of $4 trillion per year.By 2045 it’s estimated that Asia will account for 75% of global consumers and this shift in the customer base to that region will only serve to increase our reliance on seaborne trade.Furthermore, by the middle of this century, we think 70% of the world’s population will be concentrated in cities, and most of those cities are on or near the coast. So this urbanised littoral environment will link to a maritime domain that is going to become more congested, more cluttered and more contested.And with a growing demand for, and dwindling supply of, basic resources, this is going to lead to increased competition over energy, food and water, and that competition will surely play out on the seas.These are some of the global strategic trends that define the maritime environment as we look out towards 2035.Britain’s access to the global commons that is the sea is arguably the predominant factor behind our place at the top table of the international system. It has been for hundreds of years and I would contend it still is today.And as we look forward, that global commons will continue to provide the same opportunities both for access and freedom of manoeuvre that has for so long assured our national prosperity and our national security.But challenges in that area also abound. Whilst the seas are governed broadly by international law and conventional norms, for the most part the adherence to those laws is reliant on common consent.It’s hard to police them everywhere upon the seas. The sheer size of those oceans and seas makes policing them a nearly impossible. And whilst further regulation would probably risk constraining our own freedom of manoeuvre upon which our trade relies, we must therefore accept that the sea is going to be, increasingly, an environment open to exploitation.Our interests are not just restricted to activity on the seas either, but also under the sea is just as vital to our prosperity and security.And then Information, the new global resource, the new global commons. We’re going to operate in an increasingly information-dominated battlespace. It’s no longer just the enabler to warfare that it used to be, it’s now a fully-fledged national lever of power in its own right.We are increasingly connected; information and the internet pervades every aspect of our life; fiscal, social and cultural.As I reflected back on a previous event here at RUSI this week, the space conference where my Royal Air Force counterpart Steve Hillier focussed rightly on the intensifying threats to our satellite network on which we depend, which could also impact on our life, it’s hard not to conclude that we’re looking at challenge from satellites to the sea bed.And when it comes to the flow of information, 97% of data transfer occurs now not by satellite but by underwater cables. And should that underwater network be compromised in any way it is assessed that satellite networks would only have sufficient bandwidth for about 7% of what currently passes on those cables.So that international infrastructure is as vulnerable as it is critical. Commercially available unmanned underwater vehicles can already, now locate, photograph and survey undersea cables. And if this is the case, how easy could it be to disrupt the digital network or compromise it with a bespoke military capability that can get at it?Many of you will know of the existence of the Russian Ocean Reconnaissance Ship Yantar. It’s spent much of the last 6 months doing heroic and very demanding work looking for the lost Argentinian submarine in the South Atlantic and now it’s in the Eastern Mediterranean looking for their downed fighter aircraft. But it often operates on our continental seabed, and it often switches off AIS when it suits. And we know it has the capacity to get at those cables.And also Russian submarines which are often reported through open source to be ‘lurking’ in the vicinity of the underwater cables with an assessed capability to also compromise them.My Fellow chiefs have spoken on several occasions in the last 6 months about the nature of the Russian threat. Here at RUSI a few months ago, General Sir Nick Carter – the Chief of the General Staff and in two weeks’ time the new Chief of Defence Staff presented a very clear perspective of Russia through a land prism.I fully agree and support his assessment, but clearly you will expect me to make a corresponding maritime focus today.If you look at Europe from the perspective of Moscow, you would see a peninsular, and you see vulnerable maritime flanks for yourself from which Europe can threaten you. And also vulnerable maritime flanks in Europe that you can exploit.Indeed, it can be no coincidence that the Russian four strategic zones that the CGS described of the West, the Arctic, the Black Sea and the Far East are pretty much delineated by the bodies of water they lie adjacent to.In operational terms, we’ve seen Russia exploit in Syria a valuable proving ground for weapons, tactics and procedures, giving their current and future commanders critical operational experience in that theatre. This has been prevalent in the way they have colonized the Eastern Mediterranean, the Black and Caspian Seas.Some might have regarded, for example, the Kuznetsov carrier group deployment a failure. Everyone remembers the photographs of smoke belching from the funnel. They remember jets being disembarked to Syria on arrival, and two of them being lost during carrier ops in the Med. But knowing what they do I’m pretty sure they will have learned some hard lessons from that. And they will have thought long and hard about the message of presence and posture that deployment brought. I sense they will be better next time; they learn rapidly.And their proving of their capability to fire the KALIBR cruise missile from ships in the Caspian Sea onto targets in Syria was a groundbreaking moment of how maritime operations can influence the land.When you then combine that with a 10-fold increase in activity in the North Atlantic, as the Secretary of State mentioned this morning, particularly in the sub-surface environment, the inescapable conclusion is that we are facing significantly emboldened Russian Naval activity, which is continually testing our resolve.Perhaps even more challenging is Russian methodology they employ hybrid, ambiguous, deliberate and giving the advantage of having the initiative.It means that whilst an assessment of their military capability is increasingly able to be made, an assessment of intent is (as always) far harder, and that only serves to heighten the risk of miscalculation.That’s why alongside so many of our key allies here today we’re protecting own back yard in the North Atlantic as a pivotal national task. Because Failure to do so will define our national security situation for decades to come.Ours will be a joined-up response with our allies. NATO, for so long the cornerstone of our national defence that is being bolstered in our ability to protect those areas, not least by the recently re-constituted US 2nd Fleet, right in the grain of that thinking.So be in no doubt, the RN has no intention of playing merely a stand by bit part, we will be at the vanguard of this work.By setting out our stall now, by clearly demonstrating our resolve to defend our interests and uphold the international rules based system, we will set the conditions for the future, and that’s a future that we can, if we are canny, hold right the way out to 2035. That’s why I’m concentrating on it now.As we consider this challenge within the context of our future operating environment, rarely has it been more important to do so.The growing importance of the high north over the coming decades, both for indigenous resource and for trade routes, presents new opportunity. But these opportunities also open up a new arena for competition. Without an established rules framework to define our approach to this new environment the potential for escalation there is all too real.The North Atlantic will not just going to be the limit of our future focus. Many of the threats we face in that Joint Operating Area are deepening, of course, but they are broadening too.Much of the activity that we are currently engaged in across the world’s oceans serve as an indicator of what we can expect in the future. migrants crossing the Mediterranean to Europe to escape instability in Africa will probably be with us for some time the presence of strategic choke points threatened by proxy wars in the Middle East; the Houthis in Yemen threatening the straights of Bab Al Mendeb are not going to go away the potential for state on state competition in South China Sea None of these are direct pointers to the future character of Naval conflict in their own right, but they’re pointing to contested and congested waters.What they do demonstrate is an emergent trend, all of them are manifestations of global competition and the potential for a breakdown of a rules based system.Non-state players are ever-more present in the maritime domain, and they are empowered through the freedom of weapons proliferation which is arming them. And the resultant surge of investment by nations around the world in their Navies to counter that is only going to serve to increase congestion on, and above the seas.Nowhere is the rapid expansion of Naval forces more evident than in China.Only last week, their first domestically built, 50,000-tonne carrier put to sea for trials, a powerful embodiment of their global ambition.In 5 years, it’s reasonable to expect that wherever we are operating, the Chinese will be there too. And in 10 years, we think the Chinese submarine fleet will outnumber that of the United States Navy.This creates an interesting bi-lateral dynamic for us as a nation, striking a balance between our relationship with China as a valued trade partner, particularly valuable in the wake of BREXIT, yet also evaluating our relationship as a potentially capable Naval power. Which may not pose direct threat to our activity but our influence on behalf of global Britain could well see them contest our ability to conduct Freedom of Navigation operations, a pivotal maritime component of the Rules Based International System.And if we consider this context, the backdrop that will define our operations in the decades to come, one thing to me is clear.The responsibility for our national deterrent vested in the Royal Navy, both nuclear and conventional, overlaid on top of our continuing mission to secure our sea lines of communication and our critical national infrastructure, will need to draw on credible military capability with sufficient versatility to face the full spectrum of threats we face, and sufficient strength to win in a peer-on-peer contest should that be required, almost certainly in conjunction with our allies and partners.And that response of course starts with the Queen Elizabeth Class Carriers, which will soon sit at the head of a globally deployable balanced fleet.A fleet that comprises a self-contained force capable of operating under and on water, in the air, from the sea to the land, and with partners and allies through space and cyberspace.A fleet that is going to carry the heart of our nation’s expeditionary strike capability – the F35B Lightning jets around which the carriers are designed. But also to carry our Royal Marines Commandos – the only land force capable of credible, high tempo, high readiness intervention from the sea in all environments and in arduous conditions.A fleet that will bring a world-beating suite of capabilities, sensors and weapons like the Radars in our Type 45 destroyers, the new Sea Ceptor Missiles in our Frigates that have just been declared in service today as you’ve heard.As I highlighted earlier, the platforms that we are building now will be pretty much ones we will be operating in 2035.So we have to future proof that fleet. Nothing short of the full digitisation of our service will be sufficient as we head towards a new era of machine-speed warfare.Our new ships, submarines and aircraft are all designed to be cutting edge from the outset, but we must continue to explore new and evolving technologies to keep them in that place throughout their time in service.Capabilities like unmanned mine countermeasure vessels and unmanned rotorcraft, open architecture command systems, high energy weapons systems. All of these will complement and enhance our ships’ warfighting capabilities in response to new and evolving threats.We have to have the capability to bring all of that in with the current fleet and innovation will certainly be the key to doing that. The Royal Navy has a strong pedigree in this area which I’m proud of but we constantly need to challenge ourselves to do more. It’s the focus of significant investment already, with dedicated tech accelerators in the fields of Cyber, Artificial Intelligence, Information Warfare and unmanned air, surface and underwater vehicles.But technology alone will not win the conflicts of the future. We need to be innovative in the ‘how we do things’, not just the ‘what with’ – I think Nelson understood that and we still take the tempo from him.So as much as the future fleet will be increasingly automated, so too it will continue to be reliant on the best people to do the things that only people can do.The values that have defined our service for centuries – we define them now as courage, commitment, loyalty, integrity, discipline and respect; “C2DRIL” as we drum into our sailors – they will be the watchwords of a new generation. Millennials who have grown up in the digital era, young men and women with that innate freedom of thought to innovate and adapt in this modern, high-tech world. We have to get our fair share of them to make that Navy a reality.And in this interconnected future, and we will continue to operate closely with allies. This demands the compromises of interoperability, both in our equipment and through a better understanding of each other.So we can continue to build and lead alliances through active engagement, as we are doing right now with NATO forces in the Eastern Med.So as I conclude, there is no question that in the decades to come the character of Naval warfare is going to continue to evolve, perhaps at a greater pace than we have ever seen before.But I would like to return to another of the themes of Freedman’s book as I close.As much as the pace of technological change may define the future character of conflict, as he recognised, so too is the future of warfare also shaped by many elements of continuity. Not everything will change and working out which is which will be key.In 2035 there is little doubt in my mind that the security and prosperity of this island nation will still rest upon our access to, and our freedom of manoeuvre on, the global commons that is the sea.So we must protect our vital sea lines of communication. We must protect our vital national offshore and underwater infrastructure. We must protect our natural maritime resources.And we must deter those who would threaten our interests and seek to compromise the rules which govern the global commons, which are of such vital consequence to our nation’s future.We’ve got to continue to build alliances, working with our partners to the common good that will enable our national influence to be exerted around the world on behalf of our ambition for global Britain.And in the decades to come, in keeping with half a millennium of tradition, I’m convinced that’s exactly what the Royal Navy intends to do.last_img read more