Chris Bell – Sale Sharks

first_imgCB: Only my face. I’m getting badgered to have my back waxed by my girlfriend, but I’m going to hold out as long as I can.RW: What’s the most you’ve spent on something, apart from a house?CB: I spent £9,000 on my car and I’ll probably spend more on my new one. I want a 4×4 – I’m very messy and my car is full of crap. Saying that, I’ll probably just fill the bigger one with crap! I spent £1,700 on a sofa. When I broke my foot I was lying on my sofa for two weeks and I realised how uncomfortable it was. As soon as I could walk I went and picked out a big corner sofa. The problem was it didn’t arrive for ten weeks so I still had this rubbish sofa to sit on while I was injured and by the time it came I was fit.RW: What’s your earliest memory?CB: Going to rugby training when I was four and a half, seeing people play, then telling my dad I didn’t want to do it because it looked really rough! Six months later, I went back and did it.RW: What’s the funniest thing you’ve ever seen happen in a match?CB: Watching a game in Ireland once, the rain was coming down so hard one of the wingers was standing behind a post protector to keep warm!RW: Didn’t something pretty funny happen to you at the Churchill Cup – or should that be embarrassing?CB: It had been dry all week but on the night before and morning of the game with Scotland A it was lashing it down. So, when I got the ball out wide near the line, instead of stepping inside I decided to hit the ground and slide in. But it wasn’t wet enough and I only made it a couple of metres. I tried to convince the ref I’d crossed the line but he knew I hadn’t. I got ribbed a lot for that.Learn more about Chris’s teammates at Sale Sharks… TAGS: Sale Sharks LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Mark Cueto Dwayne Peel Chris BellWhen Chris Bell made a move to Sale Sharks, he took some time out to have a quick catch up about his ideal woman, waxing, finally entering the digital age, and his ‘epileptic’ music taste. RUGBY WORLD: You’ve been at Sale a few weeks now, so how have you settled in at the club?CHRIS BELL: I knew a few of the guys here before I came – Magnus Lund, Richard Wigglesworth, Andy Titterrell, Chris Jones, Stuart Turner, Dean Schofield. It’s handy to know people because it breaks down barriers when you first arrive. Pre-season’s gone well, although I did twist my ankle and had to have a few scans to check the screw in my foot hadn’t moved.RW: Does having a screw in your foot mean you beep when you go through X-ray machines?CB: I thought I would, but I don’t. I was a bit disappointed, especially as it’s a big old one. It was put in when I broke my foot during last year’s pre-season and it’s actually three inches long.RW: Have the Sale boys made you do anything as an initiation?CB: I had to sing a song on the bus after the Biarritz pre-season game. I did Good Riddance (Time Of Your Life) by Green Day. I listened to it all week on my i-Pod so I could try to remember the words!I was out of key, out of time and forgot some of the words, but managed to get through a verse and a chorus without getting booed, which was the main thing. It was so bad it was almost good!RW: So what music do you like?CB: My girlfriend, Elle, just bought me my i-Pod – so I’ve finally entered the digital age. I was a bit prehistoric before with all my CDs! I’ve got loads of different stuff on there – Jack Johnson, Sublime; I’ve got eclectic music taste. Once in an interview I said I had epileptic taste!Elle Macpherson – Chris’s ideal womanElle Macpherson, Nigella Lawson, and Embarrassing match play…RW: Do you like breasts, bum or legs?CB: Ideally the whole package, but primarily a good bum! My ideal woman would look like Elle Macpherson and cook like Nigella Lawson.RW: We all know Gav shaves his legs – do you shave/wax any body parts?last_img read more

Millennium Stadium goes healthy for New Year

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby fans enjoyed 8,000 hot dogs, 4,000 pies, 800 faggots and peas and 200 pizzas the last time that Warren Gatland’s Wales squad faced England at the Millennium Stadium in 2009. “An outing to the Millennium Stadium will always be considered a treat,” added Mr Toms. “But as awareness of healthy food continues to grow we look forward to offering a range of locally-produced, healthy foods at the venue.”  Throughout 2010, Millennium Stadium’s caterers introduced more and more local ingredients to the menu as part of its commitment to get behind the Truly British, Truly Local food sourcing campaign.The Truly Local initiative ensures that the food on the Millennium Stadium’s menu is made from local ingredients and sourced within a restricted radius of Cardiff’s city-centre venue, presenting opportunities for Welsh farmers, growers and producers. Wales taking on France during last years Six Nations Welsh rugby fans watching their waistlines after the festive period will be cheered by the news that the Millennium Stadium will be stocking a choice of healthy food throughout the 2011 RBS 6 Nations Championship.Rugby supporters can choose fresh soup and noodles at food outlets inside the home of Welsh sport when Wales face England for the Friday night opener of the tournament on 4 February (kick-off 7.45pm) and when Ireland travel to Cardiff on Saturday, 12 March (kick-off 5.00pm).Millennium Stadium’s caterers trialled the low-fat snacks throughout the 2010 Autumn Series and found that demand increased each week for healthy alternatives when Wales clashed with four of the world’s best rugby teams. At Wales v New Zealand last month, roughly 400 fans went for the healthier option and Millennium Stadium staff are expecting numbers to improve again in the New Year.Gerry Toms, Stadium Manager, said: “We have found that there is a clear demand for healthy eating options at Millennium Stadium events. It was always the intention of our catering team to introduce healthier options in the New Year and I’m delighted that the rugby fans enjoyed a sample of what was on offer last month, during the Autumn Internationals.“Lots of us begin the New Year with a plan to improve our health after an indulgent Christmas period. At the Millennium Stadium, we welcomed 1,200 party-goers in December for a traditional Christmas dinner and we hope that our range of food and beverage options will attract them back again for the rugby, whatever their New Year’s resolutions!”center_img In Pembrokeshire in particular, a hotspot for early crops and extended seasons due to warm sea breezes and fertile soils, local farmers are producing the best quality vegetables in readiness for up to 150,000 rugby fans that will descend on the Millennium Stadium for the 2011 RBS 6 Nations in February.For further information, please contact MS Communications Manager Gemma James on email and telephone: 07725828498.last_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgButter fingersTwo Irish players wasted try-scoring opportunities by dropping passes this weekend. Conor Murray squandered one chance in Munster’s 22-5 loss to Glasgow Warriors, although given the final score-line, it didn’t have a direct effect on the result.Perhaps more important was Dave Kearney’s mishandling of what should have been a try-scoring pass from Jimmy Gopperth when Leinster were trailing the Ospreys 19-13. The Irish side won a penalty from the subsequent lineout and kicked it, but as they eventually lost 25-19, a try from Kearney could have made a big difference. Head coach Gregor Townsend was delighted with his team, saying: “I’m very proud of them. I never won here as a player so to come here and produce a performance like that is very special. The scramble defence really pleased me, bodies on the line certainly saved at least two tries.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The SinnersKnoyle boils overA bit of fisticuffs is not uncommon in rugby, but Gloucester scrum-half Tavis Knoyle stepped over the mark of what is acceptable when he laid into Bath No 8 Leroy Houston during Saturday’s West Country Derby.Seeing red: Tavis Knoyle (left) is sent offIt was late in what had been a torrid game – see below – but however riled a player is by what has gone before, or what is happening now, they have to exhibit better self-control than Knoyle did.Caught at the bottom of a collapsing maul, Knoyle may well have taken a blow to the head, but he retaliated in the strongest fashion, chasing after Houston and aiming punches at his head. His assault on Houston sparked a mass brawl, after which Knoyle was quite rightly sent off.Once Upon a Time in the WestGloucester v Bath derby games are always passionate affairs, with both sides giving it their all for the local bragging rights. Nothing wrong with that, but Saturday’s game at Kingsholm degenerated into a farce with two Gloucester players being sent off and a total of five players being sin-binned, three from Bath and two from Gloucester.To make matters worse, a teenage fan threw an empty soft-drink bottle towards officials and players in the tunnel area from the grandstand at the end of the game. He was at Kingsholm with a tour group, accompanied by school teachers, and has admitted the act and apologised, but it all added to a bad-tempered end to the game, with many fans joining in a chant against referee Tim Wigglesworth and booing him.Knoyle (see above) was the second player to be sent off, with prop Sila Puafisi received his marching orders earlier in the second half for a horrible high tackle on Nick Abendanon. Bath’s Matt Garvey had been sin-binned for a slightly less severe high tackle on Gareth Evans in the first half.Huia Edmonds was shown his yellow card for driving through a player in the air at the lineout, while Mike Tindall, Carl Fearns and Dave Attwood all got their temporary marching orders for cynical offences at the breakdown.It was probably the busiest afternoon referee Wigglesworth has ever had in charge of a game and while some critics say he shouldn’t have been so quick with his cards and penalties, I feel he was punishing the offences he saw and more blame should be laid at the door of the players than the officials.For the record, Bath won 18-17, thanks to a late penalty try. It has been a weekend full of talking points, with records broken, landmarks reached and no shortage of controversy to boot.center_img Just (ten) grand! David Lemi celebrates as he scores the Premiership’s 10,000th try The SaintsGolden OldieBranded “too old” and “past his sell-by date” by Newcastle Falcons boss Dean Richards last month, David Lemi carried on proving Richards and any other doubters wrong when he wrote his name in the Premiership Rugby record books at the weekend by scoring the competition’s 10,000th try. And it was a peach, as he kicked and chased from his own half, beating the Exeter Chiefs defence with a mixture of pace, guile and strength.The Samoan wing might be 32, but he is still shining in a Worcester Warriors team that is all but doomed to relegation after this 38-33 defeat. Sadly for them, his second try late in the game was not enough for his team to claim a priceless win. Next season Lemi will be playing for Bristol and is sure to continue troubling defences whether he is in the Aviva Premiership or the Championship.Never ending storyAnother Premiership landmark was set at the weekend, when Steve Borthwick set a new record for appearances in the competition.The 34-year-old Saracens captain played his 263rd Premiership game, beating George Chuter’s record of 262. He has started 256 of those matches, clocking up over 20,000 minutes of playing time.Still standing: Borthwick (right)Saracens director of rugby Mark McCall paid tribute to Borthwick, saying: “All the captains I have been involved with lead by example, are great motivators or are able to change things around on the pitch. But Steve is all those things. It is unbelievably rare and he is probably the first in my experience who has everything and can do all those jobs. We are going to have a big hole in our organisation when he leaves.”Trimble trebleAndrew Trimble has been in storming form this year for Ulster and Ireland but that has not been reflected in the try-scoring statistics, as he had just one RaboDirect Pro 12 try to his name before this weekend.The wing’s figures are looking healthier now as he ran in a hat-trick of tries in Ulster’s 58-12 win over Connacht – a victory which lifted Trimble’s team above Munster into second spot in the Pro 12, giving them a chance of a home semi-final.Not content with scoring a treble, Trimble also made a try for Tommy Bowe with a good break.Magic momentThere is nothing so exciting to watch in rugby as a fast-running, free-flowing move which creates a try, and two Scarlets combined in just such a memorable score on Saturday. Jordan Williams dashed out of defence, passed to Liam Williams who made some more ground up the left and offloaded superbly back to his team-mate Jordan Williams, who duly finished a fine try.With the new European Rugby Champions Cup now confirmed, the Scarlets know they need to hang onto sixth spot in the RaboDirect Pro 12 to qualify, as the better of the two Italian sides will take the seventh qualifying spot, no matter where they finish. The Welsh region managed to stay ten points clear of seventh-placed Edinburgh with their 27-20 home win over Zebre and Liam Williams was named Man of the Match.Friend and foeRugby prides itself on the fellowship between players from different clubs and Bryan Habana produced a shining example of that this weekend when his Toulon side played Begles Bordeaux.One of his opponents, Jefferson Poirot, injured his right leg during the game and Habana wrapped his arm around him and gave him a shoulder to lean on to help him off the pitch and into the changing rooms. What a classy response from the great South African wing.Glorious GlasgowGlasgow Warriors became the first team to beat Munster at Thomond Park this season, taking the game to their Irish hosts with three first-half tries and then battening down the defensive hatches to secure a 22-5 win.Jonny Gray, Sean Maitland and Man of the Match Josh Strauss scored the Warriors’ tries and everyone contributed to the critical defensive effort which kept Munster at bay. The win means Glasgow are in a strong position to qualify for the RaboDirect Pro 12 semi-finals and could even sneak up into second spot and thereby gain home advantage. TAGS: Glasgow WarriorsGloucesterNewcastle FalconsScarlets last_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The SinnersMissing youRichie McCaw is among the bad boys this week, for missing what should have been a try-saving tackle. There, that’s not a sentence you often see! The All Blacks skipper let Marland Yarde through for England’s first try, but luckily for him it didn’t cost his team the game.Touchdown! Marland Yarde scores the try which Richie McCaw should have stoppedExpensive mistakeJamie Roberts finds himself on the naughty step after getting himself sin-binned for taking out an airborne Willie le Roux during Wales’s defeat in Durban. A stricter ref might have red-carded Roberts, even though the hit looked accidental, so in some ways he was lucky to be able to return to the fray. However, what was not so lucky was the 14 points Wales had conceded to South Africa in his absence.Roberts wasn’t alone in having errors to contemplate after the 38-16 loss to South Africa. The Wales pack, which Warren Gatland has spent his reign building, was totally outmuscled by the hosts and Adam Jones, so many times a hero for his nation, was taken off after half an hour even though he wasn’t injured.Wales will be keen to do better, much better, next weekend.Trailing in his wake: Weary Wales players watch as Ian Evans tries to stop Duane VermeulenDark moment for MoonlightCanada’s full-back James Pritchard had just kicked them into a 17-16 lead over Scotland. There were ten minutes to go and the hosts just needed to keep cool heads and battle to the finish to secure a precious win over the Scots. Almost as good was wing Bryan Habana, who grabbed a brace of opportunistic tries to show his predatory instincts remain as sharp as ever, and capped off a fine weekend by announcing the birth of his first child, a day after his own 31st birthday. Plenty to celebrate there, then.Unstoppable: Paul Hill on the charge for England U20s in their semi-final win over IrelandDanny’s No 1England U20s qualified for their second consecutive IRB Junior World Championship final with an emphatic 42-15 semi-final win over Ireland on Sunday morning. There were glimpses of excellence from half a dozen or more England players, but loosehead prop Danny Hobbs-Awoyemi carried off the Man of the Match award for a magnificent all-round display.He was part of a scrum which took Ireland to pieces on several occasions and he powered over for a try, after taking a scoring pass from his front row pal, tighthead Paul Hill.Hobbs-Awoyemi even put through a grubber kick which led to Ireland going into touch inside their own 22 and hooker Tom Woolstencroft scored from the lineout. Not a bad skills-set for a No 1. Brilliant Ben: All Blacks full-back Ben Smith makes his try-saving tackle on Manu Tuilagi We hand out bouquets and brickbats after a scintillating weekend of rugby The SaintsSuper SmithNew Zealand pipped England 28-27 in a ding-dong Test match battle on Saturday, and so took an unassailable 2-0 lead in the series. The brightest spark in the All Blacks side was full-back Ben Smith, who put in an absolutely magnificent display.He had won 27 caps at wing, centre or off the bench but this was his first start in the No 15 jersey and he wore it well.When England were already 10-6 up towards the end of the first half, Smith chased down Manu Tuilagi as the England wing sprinted up the right from his own 22 and was closing in on the All Blacks line. If Tuilagi had scored and stretched England’s advantage, the hosts would have had a mountain to climb to come back, but Smith ensured he didn’t by tackling him, then stripping the ball from him on the ground.Smith was also prominent in attack throughout the game, scoring New Zealand’s first try and frequently sending England’s defence scrambling.He was named Man of the Match and his coach Steve Hansen said: “His all-round game was very good and he mirrored what he has been doing in Super Rugby at full-back. He’s been waiting a long time to get an opportunity and he seized it.”Hold up!England’s replacement prop Matt Mullan claimed a notable scalp in Dunedin on Saturday. Earning only his fourth cap off the bench, the 27-year-old stopped one of the game’s all-time greats in his tracks, when he held up Richie McCaw over the try-line.The All Blacks were 28-20 up with just four minutes to go, so if England’s hopes of a win weren’t already dead and buried, they certainly would have been had McCaw turned a period of powerful attacking play into a try. However, Mullan wasn’t about to give up and he managed to prevent McCaw from scoring when the world-famous openside charged over the line.England earned a penalty from the ensuing scrum and cleared their lines and Chris Ashton scored their last-gasp try a few minutes later, which meant England lost by just a single point.Roaring success: Sean Lamont became Scotland’s second most-capped player on SaturdayLong live LamontIt was a landmark day for Sean Lamont on Saturday when he turned out for Scotland v Canada in Toronto. The 33-year-old won his 88th Scotland cap, which took him past Scott Murray and into second place in the list of his nation’s most-capped players of all time.Lamont has started 85 of his 88 Tests, having made his debut against Samoa back in June 2004. Saturday was his 16th start in the centre, with the rest having been made on the wing, and he has scored 12 tries in his Test career.The only player ahead of Lamont now is Chris Paterson, who won 109 caps. Whether or not Lamont ends up overtaking him, he has still enjoyed a career to be proud of.Red-hot le RouxJust as Ben Smith shone at full-back for New Zealand, Willie le Roux was in stunning form for the Springboks as they beat Wales 38-16 in Durban. Everything he did, he did well, creating tries, scoring one and opening up a different box of tricks to the normal physical South African approach. Unfortunately for them, openside flanker John Moonlight failed in this mission. Almost immediately after the re-start, Canada’s replacement scrum-half Gordon McRorie launched a wayward box kick, Moonlight found himself in an offside position as the ball bounced up off the turf, but just could not resist grabbing it. Result – a penalty to Scotland which Greig Laidlaw kicked to give the tourists a 19-17 lead, which they never relinquished.last_img read more

Six Nations: Saint-Andre shuffles the pack…again

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Philippe-Saint Andre is still looking for the right combination from his French side as he strives to find a winning formula Contrast that shocking lack of consistency with Wales. They have played 37 Tests to France’s 34 since the start of 2012 and in that time Mike Phillips has started 27 Tests and Dan Biggar 19. Of their 17 Six Nations matches, Wales have won 13 and France a mere seven.Warren Gatland may have his faults, but what France would give for a coach who could make up his mind. So not for the first time in his three-year reign Philippe Saint-Andre [PSA] has taken a broom to the Bleus, changing a third of the XV for the visit of Wales to the Stade de France on Saturday. Out goes full-back Scott Spedding, replaced by Brice Dulin, along with the injured Teddy Thomas, whose place on the left wing is filled by Sofiane Guitoune. Romain Taofifenua replaces the suspended Pascal Papé in the second row and Mathieu Bastareaud is axed in favour of Castres Remi Lamerat. Pity poor Wesley Fofana who must now acquaint himself with his sixth midfield partner in two years.After PSA finally gave up on his wacky idea of playing France’s most gifted centre on the wing during 2012, Fofana was moved back to where he belongs and paired first with Florian Fritz. That partnership last half a dozen Tests before PSA dropped Fritz for his Toulouse teammate Gael Fickou. The youngster, just 19 when he made his debut against Scotland in March 2013, wasn’t given long to find his feet at Test level before he was supplanted by Maxime Mermoz.Classy operator: Wesley Fofana must get used to working with his sixth partner in two years (Pic Action Images)That Toulon star soon waned and in came Mathieu Bastareaud, playing alongside Fofana for most of 2014. But come last November’s triumvirate of Tests and PSA was chopping and changing again, this time pairing Fofana with the craft of Alexandre Dumoulin. Injury to the Racing centre at the start of 2015 prompted PSA to revert to the bullocking Basta but after two rounds of the Six Nations, the France coach seems to have realised that his 17 ½ stone centre is best used off the bench late on.The fifth change for the Wales match is at scrum-half, where Morgan Parra will make his first start for France since the disastrous summer tour to Australia in June in place of Rory Kockott. Parra will play inside his club colleague, Camille Lopez, the first time the Clermont half-backs have been paired together in a France starting XV.It will be the fifteenth – yes, 15th – half-back pairing selected by Philippe Saint-Andre in his 35 Tests in charge, proof, if any more was needed, that he won’t go down in the annals of Test match rugby as one of the more astute coaches.In from the cold: Morgan Parra makes his first start since a horror Australia tour (Pic Action Images)For nowhere is the chaos of PSA’s reign more apparent than at half-back. He began, in those faraway days of February 2012, with Dimitri Yachvili and Francois Trinh-Duc. They lasted one Test – the victory over Italy – before he plumped for Morgan Parra and Trinh-Duc. By the time France hosted England in that season’s Six Nations, it was Julien Dupuy wearing the No 9 shirt and Lionel Beauxis at ten. Beaten by England, PSA axed Dupuy for the trip to Wales in preference for Yachvili.That indecisiveness  set the tone for what’s followed. On the 2012 summer tour to Argentina, PSA got it into his head that Maxime Machenaud and Frederic Michalak could be a marriage made in heaven, and indeed their alliance bore fruit with victories over Argentina in the second Test and then wins against Australia and Argentine in the November Tests of 2012. Though Morgan Parra was brought in for the last of that series of Tests (the win against Samoa),  Machenaud and Michalak were reunited for the start of the 2013 Six Nations.France began that tournament as serious contenders, what with their 33-6 hammering of the Wallabies in November, but defeat to Italy and Wales in their opening two matches led PSA to part company with Machenaud and Michalak. In came Parra and Trinh-Duch for the trip (and defeat) to Twickenham, and out went the Montpellier fly-half the following match, as Michalak was recalled.center_img Playmaker: Camille Lopez gets to play outside his club partner Camille Lopez (Pic Action Images)Come on, try and keep up.It was all change again when France toured New Zealand in June 2013 with Machenaud back in the scrum-half saddle, paired for the first Test with Camille Lopez and with Michalak in the second Test. The third Test? PSA thought it might work if he paired Jean-Marc Doussain with Remi Tales. It didn’t. The French lost 24-9.And so it’s continued. Parra and Tales started all three of France’s November Tests in 2013 but by the time of the 2014 Six Nations PSA was smitten with Doussain and Jules Plisson. They also lasted three games before Doussain was dropped for Machenaud. One Test later it was Plisson’s turn to feel the sharp blade of the guillotine with Tales recalled.After the calamity of last summer’s tour to Australia, PSA recalled Sebastien Tillous-Borde in November after a five-year hiatus from Test rugby, while placing his faith in Lopez at fly-half.Now here’s a stat that might yield a clue as to why France have been so poor since 2012. The Wales game will be Lopez’s sixth consecutive start in the 10 shirt, and should he survive Saturday’s encounter and face Italy next month he will be the only fly-half under PSA to have played seven Tests in a row (Michalak also managed six straight appearances in 2012/13). Merry-go-round: Philippe Saint-Andre is still looking for his perfect combination (Credit Action Images) last_img read more

RBS Six Nations: Ireland 16-16 Wales

first_img Tight tussle: Keith Earls makes a tackle on Tom James. Photo: Getty Images 23 – The number of ball carries made by CJ Stander, seven more than Wales’ top carrier Liam Williams.Front foot: CJ Stander stood out on his debut for Ireland. Photo: Getty Images21 – The number of tackles made by Jamie Roberts and Taulupe Faletau, more than any other players.95 – The number of metres made by Liam Williams, the most by any player.Ireland: S Zebo; A Trimble, J Payne, R Henshaw, K Earls (D Kearney 73); J Sexton (I Madigan 76), C Murray; J McGrath, R Best (capt, S Cronin 76), N White (T Furlong 64), M McCarthy (D Ryan 64), D Toner, CJ Stander, T O’Donnell (R Ruddock 49), J Heaslip.Try: Murray. Con: Sexton. Pens: Sexton 3.Wales: G Anscombe; G North, J Davies, J Roberts, T James; D Biggar (R Priestland 22), G Davies (L Williams 73); R Evans (G Jenkins 53), S Baldwin (K Owens 64), S Lee (T Francis 58), L Charteris (B Davies 62), AW Jones, S Warburton (capt, D Lydiate 73), J Tipuric, T Faletau.Try: Faletau. Con: Priestland. Pens: Priestland 3.Referee: Jerome Garces (France) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS What’s hot and what’s not from the final round one game of the 2016 Six Nations Draws are often dull, drab affairs, but this one in Dublin was hugely entertaining and incredibly tense. Both sides shook off the shackles, putting any suggestions that they are boring or predictable in the shredder as they launched wave after wave of attack, be the players in green or red. Ireland took a 13-0 lead thanks to Johnny Sexton’s boot and a try from Conor Murray but Wales hit back with a Taulupe Faletau touchdown and nine points from Rhys Priestland, who replaced the injured Dan Biggar early on. The two kickers exchanged penalties in the final ten minutes and while both teams tried to break the deadlock late on the scores remained level. This draw certainly opens things up in terms of the race for the Six Nations title – and expect to see more running rugby from both sides throughout the championship.Mind the gap: Conor Murray bursts over to score for Ireland. Photo: Getty ImagesWHAT’S HOT…Adventurous spirit – Both Ireland and Wales demonstrated a real intent and adventure in attack. Ireland’s kick-dominated game that drew such criticism last season was nowhere to be seen, with the most significant high ball of the first half coming from the boot of Liam Williams and reaching the hands of Dan Biggar. Instead, Ireland used CJ Stander, who was named Man of the Match on debut, to make significant inroads in midfield before spreading the ball wide and finding half-gaps to sneak through, with Robbie Henshaw and Simon Zebo particularly prominent.Wales, too, showed more variety in their attacking game, mixing the hard carries of Jamie Roberts, Alun Wyn Jones and Rob Evans with long passes to the wings where there often seemed to be space for the likes of Jonathan Davies and Liam Williams (a late addition to the starting team in place of the injured Gareth Anscombe) to put Ireland under pressure.The Wales scrum – The pack in red looked to have the edge from the first scrum and that advantage delivered them a try at the end of the first half. They earned penalties from a succession of 5m scrums, Taulupe Faletau going over off the last one. Even if the No 8 had not scored, a penalty try was no doubt coming Wales’ way. The young trio of Rob Evans, Scott Baldwin and Samson Lee held their own, with Gethin Jenkins able to offer considerable experience off the bench.Ground force: Taulupe Faletau gets the ball down for Wales’ try. Photo: Getty ImagesDefensive authority – Given all the attacking exuberance, it was strong defensive performances that limited each team to a try apiece. Jared Payne marshalled Ireland’s back-line extremely effectively in defence and Robbie Henshaw looks like he’s trying to replicate the breakdown feats of Brian O’Driscoll with his willingness to get involved at the contact area. In the red corner, Jamie Roberts, Taulupe Faletau and Tom James were just a few of the Welshmen who made important tackles.WHAT’S NOT…Pressure tells – A catalogue of Wales’ errors led to Ireland’s try. First Rhys Priestland knocked on as he tried to pick up a poor Gareth Davies pass. Ireland kicked the ball on and Devin Toner charged Davies down as he attempted to clear from the resulting Wales lineout. Priestland collected the ball but made little ground with his clearance – and if he’d reacted better he would simply have touched the ball down for a 22 dropout. Instead, Ireland had a lineout and a few minutes later had touched down through Conor Murray. Priestland did shake off those mistakes to slot important kicks, though.On target: Rhys Priestland slotted nine points for Wales. Photo: Getty ImagesSlow starts – Warren Gatland has often bemoaned his team’s inability to start matches strongly and Wales did themselves no favours here. They allowed Ireland to gain territory through multiple phases in the first 15 minutes and while their line wasn’t breached in that period they did concede six points from the boot of Johnny Sexton. With the disruption then caused by Dan Biggar’s departure with injury, it took Wales a while to settle and they found themselves having to come back from 13-0 down. While they did fight their way back into the game, they need to play with the intensity they showed in patches for the full 80 minutes and particularly in the first 20. Had they started better, they may well have edged this match.STATISTICS5 – The number of line breaks made by Ireland, compared to none by Wales. TAGS: Highlight Man of the Match: CJ Stander (Ireland)For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

New Super Rugby law variations announced

first_imgIn addition, the golden point law variation introduced last year has been tweaked. A drawn match now to be decided by ‘golden try’ in extra time. The first try scored in the ten-minute extra time (two x five-minute halves) will win the match. If a penalty or drop-goal is successful within this extra time the points count towards the match score, but the game will continue until either a try is scored, or the ten-minute period expires. This update is to encourage attacking play in the extra time period.(via Super Rugby)NEW ZEALANDThe Sky Super Rugby Aotearoa tournament will see the introduction of a goal-line drop out for balls enforced in goal. When an attacking player carrying the ball is held up in the in-goal or knocks the ball on, play restarts with a goal-line drop out. When a kick enters the in-goal area and is forced by the defending team, play also restarts with a goal-line drop out. The tournament will again include extra-time if the scores are level – but unlike in Australia, if a match is drawn at full-time a single ten-minute period will be played with the first points scored ensuring the win.Sky Super Rugby Aotearoa is also introducing a captain’s referral. Each team will be given one referral which can be activated in one of three scenarios: any decision in the last five minutes of the game, an infringement in the build-up to a try or foul play. The Hurricanes and Highlanders in action (Getty Images) New Super Rugby law variations announcedGolden tries, goal-line drop-outs and captain’s referrals: some law innovations are coming into Super Rugby that are “designed to speed up play and increase ball-in-play time and improve the spectacle for the fans,” according to organisers.Some law variations were brought in for Super Rugby 2020 in Australia and New Zealand (an explainer table from SANZAAR has been included below) and will be retained, but several new variations are also being introduced by each competition.Fans of sevens and the recent World Tens Series may recognise some of these law variations.Here are the details for each of the tweaks in Super Rugby AU and Sky Super Rugby Aotearoa.AUSTRALIASuper Rugby AU 2021 will have kick-off and restart variations seen in sevens. For the new season, a free kick will be awarded following any infringement off the kick-off and restart. This includes an enforced 30 second time limit for restarts to happen following a conversion, penalty or drop-goal as well as restarts that are kicked out on the full or if team-mates of the kicker are not behind the ball. The team that was set to receive the ball will get a tap from halfway. This law has been introduced to quicken up general play and reduce the number of scrums. Super Rugby AU and Sky Super Rugby Aotearoa look to speed up gamecenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Video: Presiding Bishop speaks at immigration reform prayer service

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Refugees Migration & Resettlement, Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Lynette WilsonPosted Oct 9, 2013 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori offered a time of prayer and remembrance for the impacted loved ones of immigrants during an Oct. 8 prayer service in Washington, D.C., as part of the Church World Service Summit on Immigration, Oct. 7-8. Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events Immigration, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Faith & Politics, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Video: Presiding Bishop speaks at immigration reform prayer service Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Video Submit a Job Listing Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Colegio episcopal de Haití prepara a los estudiantes para la…

first_imgColegio episcopal de Haití prepara a los estudiantes para la agricultura y las empresas agrícolas Un plan de cinco años busca revitalizar la escuela y abordar la seguridad alimentaria y económica Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Por Lynette Wilson Posted Feb 24, 2016 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Haiti [Episcopal News Service –Terrier-Rouge, Haití] En una reciente mañana de febrero, un joven haitiano araba los campos en un gigantesco tractor John Deere, preparándolos para la primera siembra del año en el Centro de Agricultura San Bernabé, un colegio universitario episcopal localizado en un terreno de 192 hectáreas de fértil planicie costera en el norte de Haití.Mientras el tractor daba la vuelta sobre el oscuro suelo arcilloso, preparándolo para la siembra, dos jóvenes se ocupaban de remendar una grieta en un tanque de agua de cemento, otros dos escardaban un cantero de zanahorias y otros dos con regaderas plásticas azules y verdes regaban a mano las remolachas, zanahorias y verduras que crecen en lotes experimentales y los semilleros que brotan en el invernadero. Otro joven conducía el ganado de regreso a la propiedad, mientras otros seguían despejando más terreno para el tractor y la futura siembra.En un día de febrero, un trabajador riega a mano los semilleros del invernadero del Centro de Agricultura San Bernabé en Terrier-Rouge, Haití. Localizada en la planicie costera del norte del país, la escuela de 192 hectáreas se encuentra a unos tres kilómetros del océano Atlántico. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSEntre tanto, los alumnos —uniformados con pulóveres en cuya espalda puede leerse la sigla CASB, abreviatura en francés de Centre D’Agriculture St. Barnabas— estudiaban en el aula.Las primeras señales de vida abundante luego de un período de privaciones económicas y sequía estaban en todas partes; fue una subvención de $100.000 de la Diócesis Episcopal de Long Island en 2014 la que ayudó a San Bernabé a empezar su proceso de revitalización.“San Bernabé fue creado en el nombre de Dios, y en el mismo nombre de Dios, San Bernabé revivirá”, dijo —en creole a través de un intérprete— Etienne Saint-Ange, coordinador de operaciones del campo.Etienne Saint-Ange, coordinador de operaciones del campo, conversa con los obreros que escardan las zanahorias en la parcela experimental, donde ponen a prueba la viabilidad de las plantas. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSDurante una década el Centro de Agricultura San Bernabé funcionó sin apoyo económico, y no obstante continuó en su misión de adiestrar a técnicos agrícolas. La mitad de la población [de Haití] trabaja en la agricultura, pero una mayoría de haitianos carece de alimento y el 30 por ciento de todos los niños padece de desnutrición. Fueron Saint-Ange y otros dedicados miembros del personal los que mantuvieron el funcionamiento de la escuela, viviendo del producto de sus campos.“Los líderes del colegio fueron los únicos que lo mantuvieron funcionando de 2005 a 2014, dijo Dan Tootle, un voluntario en misión de la Iglesia Episcopal que administra el programa en San Bernabé. En diciembre de 2015, el profesorado recibió siete meses de paga retroactiva, una pequeña cantidad de los $140.000 que les debían. “Eso no constituye un problema serio porque la gente que era capaz de sostener este lugar ahora está animada de esperanza”, dijo Tootle.Dan Tootle, voluntario en misión de la Iglesia Episcopal, ha trabajado diligentemente en el plan de revitalización de San Bernabé, el cual aspira a convertir el colegio agrícola en un centro regional para el desarrollo agrícola y económico. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSTootle, de 74 años, ha servido como misionero en Haití desde 1999, cuando la iglesia de San Martín del Campo [St. Martin’s-in-the-Field] en Severna Park, Maryland, lo auspició. Él se convirtió en voluntario en misión nombrado por la Iglesia Episcopal en 2013, y desde entonces se ha concentrado en San Bernabé, trabajando en un plan de revitalización quinquenal de $11,7 millones que modernizará el colegio universitario y lo transformará en un centro regional para el desarrollo agrícola y económico. También le dará empleo a más de 180 personas.“Llevamos a cabo una rigurosa investigación en el colegio para determinar lo que llevaría revitalizar la institución”, dijo Tootle, mientras recorría un plan maestro de 35 páginas, una versión reducida del estudio completo de 76 páginas. “No se trataba sólo de un asunto de restaurarlo a lo que había sido en el pasado, sino de concebir lo que sería necesario en el siglo XXI, más allá de la mera utilización de la agricultura haitiana tradicional”.En último término, el colegio será autosostenible y capaz de proporcionar ayuda a otras instituciones diocesanas.Ahora, en su quinta iteración, incluidas las reacciones de las partes interesadas regionales y una renovación total del personal, la primera fase de 5 años incluye la construcción de nuevas instalaciones académicas y la preparación de la tierra para que tenga drenaje y accesos adecuados, así como otras obras fundacionales. La segunda fase de 1,5 años incluye la infraestructura necesaria para criar y procesar animales, así como el establecimiento de un centro de apoyo agrícola regional. La tercera y última fase incluye la construcción de un dormitorio para 250 estudiantes internos, y el resto de edificios administrativos y accesorios. Otros planes consisten en asociarse con Nuevos Ministerios [FreshMinistries] sobre los hidropónicos, los huertos establecidos y la siembra de plantas como el sisal [una fibra del henequén] específicamente para venderla a procesadores.El maestro Georges Gabriel Etienne, que enseña botánica y cultivos vegetales, les imparte a los estudiantes una lección en la parcela de prueba. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSLa capacitación que reciben los estudiantes en San Bernabé equivale a la de estudiantes que asisten a una universidad comunitaria en Estados Unidos, dijo Tootle, añadiendo que los prepara para participar directamente en empresas agrícolas y en las operaciones de cultivo. En la medida en que el currículo evoluciona, añadió, se estimulará a los estudiantes hacia el quehacer empresarial y se les proporcionarán recursos para ayudarles a lo largo del camino.Fundado en 1984 como una asociación entre la Diócesis Episcopal de Haití y la Iglesia Presbiteriana EUA, San Bernabé adquirió una reputación nacional de excelencia docente al graduar unas 30 clases a través de los años.“Jóvenes de todo el país vienen aquí para capacitarse como técnicos agrícolas”, dijo Yves Mary Etienne, economista y graduado de San Bernabé que se incorporó al profesorado en sus primeros años y ahí se mantiene.Yves Mary Etienne, economista, recoge unas muestras de col china de la parcela de prueba y se las da a una mujer de la localidad para que las venda en el mercado local. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS“San Bernabé fue creado como un adiestramiento ulterior para granjeros que no podían costear asistir a la escuela”, dijo Etienne en creole a través de un intérprete, añadiendo que los estudiantes tradicionalmente regresan a sus lugares de origen, compartiendo lo que han aprendido para beneficio de la comunidad. “San Bernabé no es sólo para el norte y el nordeste, sino que educa a estudiantes provenientes de todo el país”.Los graduados de San Bernabé también han adquirido la reputación de estar bien preparados.En Haití, es importante que los que buscan empleo tengan referencias, dijo Merlotte Pierre, que ha sido secretaria y maestra de gramática francesa de San Bernabé desde 1997. Con frecuencia, un certificado de San Bernabé resulta suficiente, dijo ella también en creole a través de un intérprete.Merlotte Pierre enseña gramática francesa a estudiantes del Centro de Agricultura San Bernabé. Pierre trabaja como secretaria del colegio universitario y como profesora de francés. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSPara estudiantes como Jonas Bien-Aimé, de 22 años, que quiere convertirse en experto agrícola, y Jouveline Pericles, de 21, cuya asignatura preferida es la conservación del suelo y que algún día le gustaría trabajar para una organización no gubernamental, San Bernabé ofrece la capacitación, la educación y las destrezas para emprender esas tareas. Los estudiantes de San Bernabé aprenden prácticas agrícolas sostenidas; todos los cultivos se desarrollan de manera orgánica, fertilizados con compost en lugar de con fertilizantes químicos, y la conservación del agua y del suelo se cuentan entre sus primeras prioridades.San Bernabé es una de las dos escuelas de oficios de la región norte de Haití pertenecientes a la Iglesia Episcopal de Haití —la otra es la del Espíritu Santo en Cabo Haitiano, que prepara a los estudiantes para trabajar como plomeros, electricistas y mecánicos. A través de la diócesis, la de mayor número de fieles de la Iglesia Episcopal, la educación es fundamental. La Diócesis de Haití dirige más de 250 escuelas primarias y secundarias a través de Haití, que aún se recobra del terremoto de magnitud 7 que devastó el país en 2010, causando la muerte de centenares de miles y desplazando a más de 1,5 millones de personas.Eliza Brinkley, misionera del Cuerpo de Servicio de Jóvenes Adultos de la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte, enseña inglés a estudiantes en el Centro de Agricultura San Bernabé. Además de estudiar agricultura y técnicas agrícolas, los alumnos aprenden inglés, francés, economía y otros temas de educación general. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSLuego del desastre, el gobierno y las agencias de socorro internacionales, prometieron miles de millones de dólares en ayuda para reconstruir la nación caribeña, considerada durante mucho tiempo como la más pobre del Hemisferio Occidental. Más de cinco años después, muchas de las ONG se han ido y Haití sigue siendo uno de los países más pobres del mundo. Sin embargo, la Iglesia Episcopal ha mantenido el rumbo y se ha comprometido con la reconstrucción de las instituciones diocesanas destruidas cerca del epicentro del terremoto próximo a la capital, Puerto Príncipe, en el sur. La Oficina de Desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal ha encabezado el empeño de reconstrucción.“Junto con la reconstrucción de la catedral de la Santa Trinidad y la Escuela de San Vicente para Discapacitados, San Bernabé es una prioridad de la Oficina de Desarrollo porque su existencia fortalecerá y respaldará la misión y el ministerio en la diócesis”, dijo Tara Elgin Holley, directora de desarrollo de la Iglesia Episcopal. “Además, la revitalización del colegio universitario y de sus 192 hectáreas de terreno alude directamente a la Quinta Marca de la Misión: ‘luchar por salvaguardar la integridad de la creación y por el sostenimiento y la renovación de la vida en la tierra’”.Pese a tener la mitad de los 10 millones de habitantes del país dedicados a la agricultura, Haití importa la mitad de los alimentos que consume, gran parte de su vecina la República Dominicana.“El plantar centenares de hectáreas de cultivos que puedan cosecharse y venderse localmente es prospecto entusiasta no sólo para los estudiantes de San Bernabé, sino para la región”, dijo Holley. “Enseñar a los jóvenes provenientes de todas partes de Haití a convertirse en técnicos agrícolas y pequeños empresarios ayudará a crear un brillante futuro para muchos. Y el ingreso de la venta de los cultivos le permitirá al colegio sostener su propio presupuesto operativo y hacer su continua existencia sostenible”.El impulso para la revitalización de San Bernabé “ha estado presente, aunque apagado, durante algún tiempo”, dijo Tootle.El Centro de Agricultura San Bernabé esta localizado en una importante falla. La escuela ha construido aulas y edificios administrativos temporales ya que el edificio original es susceptible de derrumbarse de ocurrir un evento sísmico. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENSEn 2014 ocurrieron dos cosas fundamentales, explicó él: El Comité Permanente de la diócesis asumió el control directo de la revitalización de San Bernabé, aplicando los principios del buen gobierno. Y la Diócesis de Long Island le dio a San Bernabé una donación irrestricta de $100.000, la cual le permitió al colegio hacer mejoras inmediatas, incluida la construcción de edificios temporales, la compra de semillas y de abono, el llevar a cabo labores de mantenimiento en pozos y el conectar a San Bernabé con la red eléctrica de Caracol Village.La donación de la Diócesis de Long Island fue parte de un diezmo, dijo el obispo Larry Provenzano.La diócesis vendió una propiedad de la Iglesia en el centro de Brooklyn y antes de invertir las ganancias, otorgó más de $2 millones en subvenciones a ministerios nacionales e internacionales.“Tenemos una gran población haitiana en la diócesis y hemos estado al tanto de la obra en Haití”, dijo Provenzano, añadiendo que apoyar a San Bernabé resultó una decisión fácil que también se adecuaba al compromiso de la diócesis con una “teología ecológica”.Además del apoyo de Long Island, San Bernabé ha recibido la ayuda de otras fuentes, entre ellas el del Consorcio de las Parroquias Episcopales, la Diócesis de Nueva York y la Diócesis de California. Con el apoyo del obispo de California, Marc Andrus, la misionera voluntaria para Haití Davidson Bidwell-Waite y su esposo, Edwin Bidwell-Waite, han encabezado los empeños de recaudar dinero para becas, y en abril enviarán un grupo de estudiantes a San Bernabé para ayudar con la siembra.Mientras San Bernabé prosigue en su senda de la revitalización, profesores y estudiantes están contemplando la creación de asociaciones con individuos, parroquias y diócesis que estén interesados en mayordomía ambiental y desarrollo sostenible así como en horticultura, labranza, cría de animales y apicultura, dijo Holley. “Las asociaciones son las que ayudarán a San Bernabé a crecer y a prosperar… como institución docente y como centro de información regional para la tecnología agrícola”.Para más información sobre cómo usted, su parroquia o su diócesis pueden participar, haga un clic aquí.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service.  Traducción de Vicente Echerri.  Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Anglican agency Sudra distributes aid to hundreds of South Sudanese

first_img Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Africa, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted Aug 1, 2016 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Sudan & South Sudan Submit an Event Listing Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Anglican Communion, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican agency Sudra distributes aid to hundreds of South Sudanese Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more