Monthly Archives: October 2020

How long must we wait for gun control?

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionFirst some history: 160 years ago, you could own a slave. People fought to the death for the right for you to own a slave. One hundred years ago, your mother was not entitled to vote. Thirty years ago, you could smoke a cigarette almost anywhere. Twenty years ago, Adam could marry Eve but not Steve.And so, as surely as the sun will rise tomorrow, effective gun control will come. The critical question is, “How many more children must die until then?”James FogartyNiskayunaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesPuccioni’s two goals help Niskayuna boys’ soccer top Shaker, remain perfectNiskayuna girls’ cross country wins over BethlehemEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

Peskin says goodbye with 12% NAV rise

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Raynsford forces landlords’ rethink

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Construction businesses sold to sharpen focus

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Smooth move for Britannic

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London’s Olympic blueprint unveiled

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Utah Senate votes to decriminalize polygamy among consenting adults

first_imgThe Utah state Senate voted unanimously on Tuesday effectively to decriminalize polygamy among consenting adults, reducing penalties for a practice with deep religious roots in the predominantly Mormon state.The bill, which would treat the offense of plural marriage as a simple infraction on par with a parking ticket, now moves to the Utah House of Representatives, where it is likely to face greater resistance.The bill swiftly cleared the Republican-controlled Senate on a vote of 29-0 with little discussion. It also would make it easier for otherwise law-abiding polygamists to obtain access to critical services such as medical or mental health care, education or even employment without fear, she said.Opponents of decriminalization say the current law should not be changed because polygamy is inherently dangerous and harmful to women and children, particularly young girls, some of whom have been forced into marriages with older men. REMNANT OF PRE-STATEHOODPolygamy is a remnant of the early teachings of the Utah-based Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, whose members fled persecution over the practice to settle the Utah territory in 1847. The church disavowed polygamy in 1890 as a condition of Utah statehood, and today members of the faith found to be practicing plural marriage are excommunicated.Fundamentalist Mormons, said to number more than 30,000 across the western United States, believe they are adhering to the truest form of Mormon doctrine, which promises polygamists glorification in heaven.Utah’s history of felony punishment for polygamy has never halted its practice entirely but rather driven it to the fringes of society, creating a culture of fear that allows perpetrators to thrive, Henderson said.“The solution to the problem is increased societal integration, which can only come through decriminalizing otherwise law-abiding polygamists,” Henderson said during a preliminary debate on the bill last week.Critics, however, say the measure wrongly frames polygamy as a human rights issue.“Proponents of this bill attempt to piggyback on the success of the gay rights movement by promoting the narrative that this initiative is about consenting adults doing what they will,” the anti-polygamy group Sound Choices Coalition said in a statement. “This has nothing to do about consenting adults or gay rights. It’s all about weaponizing God.”In 2013, Kody Brown, patriarch of the polygamist family featured on the “Sister Wives” television reality show, challenged the law after being investigated for bigamy by Utah County prosecutors. No charges were filed.A federal judge struck down the anti-polygamy law as unconstitutional. But a federal appeals court reversed the ruling and the US Supreme Court declined to hear the case.Topics :center_img Under current law, polygamy – typically involving a man who cohabitates with and purports to marry more than one wife – is classified as a third-degree felony, punishable by up to five years in prison.If the Senate bill becomes law, punishments for plural marriage would be limited to fines of up to $750 and community service.However, fraudulent bigamy – in which an individual obtains licenses to marry more than one spouse without their knowledge, or seeks to wed someone underage without her consent – remains a felony.The chief sponsor of the measure, Senator Deirdre Henderson, said the intent of the bill is not to legalize polygamy but to lower the penalties so those from polygamous communities who are victims of crimes can come forward without fear of being prosecuted themselves.last_img read more

Police name suspect in West Jakarta traffic accident that killed pregnant woman

first_imgThe police have named a suspect in a traffic accident that resulted in the death of a pregnant woman in Palmerah, West Jakarta.West Jakarta Police traffic unit chief Comr. Hari Admoko said the suspect, identified as Firda Meisari, had been charged under Article 310 of Law No. 22/2009 on traffic and land for causing a death, which carries a maximum punishment of six years’ imprisonment and a Rp 12 million (US$860.42) fine. “We named her a suspect on Sunday,” Hari said as quoted by Antara news agency.The incident occurred on Saturday afternoon when the victim, identified as 26-year-old Erlinda, was crossing a small street in Palmerah. She was seven months’ pregnant at the time of the incident.Read also: With freedom to break law on roads, comes deadly accidentsFirda, who was learning how to drive at that time, accidentally stepped on the accelerator pedal instead of hitting the brakes, causing her car to hit and drag Erlinda for several meters. The vehicle eventually stopped after hitting an electricity pole.The police said Firda did not have a driver’s license.Erlinda’s husband, who tried to help his wife, was also hit and dragged by the car before the vehicle eventually stopped.Erlinda was hospitalized for a few days before she passed away with her baby. They were buried in her hometown in Semarang, Central Java. (dpk)Topics :last_img read more

Under-fire New York mayor booed at George Floyd vigil

first_imgThe mayor said: “In the context of crisis, in the context of curfew, there is a point where enough is enough.”If officers say now is the point we need you to go home, it’s time to go home.”At the vigil, demonstrators among the several thousand in attendance chanted, “De Blasio go home!” and “Vote them out!” The mayor left shortly afterwards.The death of Floyd in Minneapolis last week unleashed outrage across the United States, with New York among dozens of cities seeing massive protests. New York’s mayor was widely booed Thursday during a vigil for George Floyd, an unarmed African American killed by police, after the official defended heavy handed policing of protesters defying the city’s curfew.Hundreds of mourners jeered over Bill de Blasio’s brief remarks at the Brooklyn service following a night in which videos circulating online showed police officers using batons on peaceful demonstrators.De Blasio told reporters he had not seen the footage but defended how the curfew was being enforced, saying that the NYPD had “overall” shown “a lot of restraint.” Floyd stopped breathing when a white police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes during an arrest for a non-violent suspected offence.Demonstrations earlier this week turned violent, with widespread looting, leading de Blasio to impose New York’s first curfew since World War II. It runs for the next four nights.The mayor is facing the biggest crisis of his leadership as the city still reels from the coronavirus crisis that has killed 21,000 New Yorkers.He has been criticized for supporting the police’s tactics but also for not preventing the looting of upmarket stores that rocked Manhattan neighborhoods on Sunday and Monday.A change.org petition launched last year calling for the removal of de Blasio has gained fresh impetus this week and now has around 110,000 signatures.New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, who is known to have a rocky relationship with de Blasio, mentioned on Tuesday that he has the power to “displace” the mayor.Elsewhere, around 400 current and former members of de Blasio’s administration have signed an open letter slamming him for his refusal to condemn police “brutality” during the protests.On Saturday, a video showed a police car driving into demonstrators in Brooklyn.De Blasio, 59, hoped to be the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee for November’s election but his campaign last year failed to garner much support.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Australia posts record number of new COVID-19 infections

first_imgAustralia reported a record 501 new coronavirus infections Wednesday, nearly four months after the pandemic initially peaked in the country, with authorities warning of a critical new phase in its two biggest cities. Most of the cases were reported in Victoria state, where authorities have struggled to bring an outbreak in Melbourne under control despite an almost two-week lockdown on Australia’s second-biggest city. Australia’s new coronavirus infections previously peaked on March 28 when 459 cases were reported, according to data compiled by AFP, before the country appeared to bring the virus under control and began easing harsh restrictions.  Australia, like neighboring New Zealand, has been lauded for its pandemic response.Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews announced 484 new cases and two more deaths in the state Wednesday, bringing the state’s total active cases to just over 3,400.Australia has now recorded almost 13,000 cases of COVID-19 and 128 fatalities in a country of about 25 million.Melbourne residents will be required to wear masks outside from midnight — making the city the first place in Australia to mandate face coverings in public — in a new effort to slow the virus spread. But Andrews said “further behavior change” would still be required, after analysis showed almost nine in 10 people diagnosed with coronavirus over the two weeks to Tuesday did not self-isolate between feeling sick and seeking a COVID-19 test.Just over half of people also failed to stay at home between being tested and receiving their results, he added, saying authorities believed insecure work conditions were a key driver of the trend.Andrews said casual workers across a range of industries, who do not get sick leave provisions, were worried about “feeding their kids, paying their bills” but could apply for a Aus$1,500 ($1,070) hardship payment if they contract the virus.There are growing fears about the virus spreading through vulnerable populations after outbreaks at several nursing homes while inmates at six prisons have been confined to their cells after a guard tested positive.The outbreak has left Australia rattled and dampened hopes of a speedy economic recovery. Topics : ‘Most critical’ An inquiry into how the virus spread in Melbourne heard this week that many cases were likely linked to infection control breaches at hotels used to quarantine residents returning from overseas.Victoria has effectively been sealed off from the rest of the country in an effort to contain the virus, but new cases have been detected in neighboring New South Wales state.New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian described the coming weeks as “the most critical” since the height of the last lockdown, when the state held the mantle of Australia’s hardest-hit region.Several clusters have emerged in Sydney, which health officials believe sprung up after an infected man from Melbourne visited a popular pub.”We are not out of the woods by any stretch, quite the opposite,” Berejiklian told a press conference. “We remain on high alert and we have some level of anxiety as to the extent of community transmission.”Berejiklian said new restrictions would come into force Friday to tighten rules for bars, cafes, weddings and funerals, warning they could still be extended further.”A lack of compliance now has made us go down the compulsory path and we don’t apologize for that,” she said.Some states and territories were due to report daily figures later Wednesday but new community outbreaks have not been detected in less-populated regions for weeks.last_img read more