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‘Raja Bhaiya’ floats party, says it will fight for “equality” among all castes

first_imgRaghuraj Pratap Singh alias Raja Bhaiya, a Thakur strongman from Uttar Pradesh, said the new party he was floating would focus its campaign on opposition to what he claimed was the preferential treatment being given to Dalits.Mr. Singh, a former minister in U.P. governments led by both the Samajwadi Party and the Bharatiya Janata Party, put up a show of strength with a rally at the Ramabai Ambedkar Grounds here on Friday. The independent MLA from Kunda in Pratapgarh aims to mobilise the upper castes by tapping anti-Dalit sentiment in a bid to widen his influence in the State.Voicing his opposition to the SC/ST (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, which he asserted had been made “more complicated” by successive governments, Mr. Singh said he was only fighting for “equality” among all castes and was against discrimination.Dalits were being “cut-off from the rest of the society” due to the differential standards being adopted in disbursing compensation to victims of heinous crimes.Citing murder as an example, he said, “It’s not that a Dalit [family] feels more pain while a non-Dalit feels less.”PTI adds…The former Uttar Pradesh Minister, who now represents the Kunda Assembly constituency, said the Election Commission of India had been approached for registration of his party. He had said the party’s name will have ‘Jansatta’ (people’s power) as its prefix.At the rally, Mr. Singh said governments over the years have made the Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) Act, 1989 “complex” despite the Supreme Court on March 20 providing safeguards against arrests under the law.A Bill overturning the court order was unanimously passed by Lok Sabha on August 6, ruling out any provision for anticipatory bail for a person accused of atrocities against SCs and STs.Provisions of now-amended SC/ST Act “draconian”Terming the provisions of the now-amended SC/ST Act “draconian”, he said he was opposed to them. He also opposed reservation in promotion for SC/ST employees which, he said, should be based on “the basis of capability”. “This is our clear stand,” he stated.“In the days to come, I will be labelled anti-Dalit. I want to tell you I am not anti-Dalit, I am only talking about equality. Dalits are my brothers,” he said. “All political parties are indulging in dividing society on caste and religious lines. They give diplomatic answers to crucial issues. We want brotherhood and unity.”Mr. Singh asked why there was different standards for compensation in rape and murder cases. “For the heinous acts, there should be same compensation,” he said.“Going by the fundamental principle of equality, whether it is a heinous crime like rape or murder, Dalits are being treated differently and given compensation by the government while the general public and the upper castes are left out,” he said.Mr. Singh, who has faced 48 cases, has been a Minister in governments headed by Akhilesh Yadav, Kalyan Singh and Rajnath Singh.In November 2002, the Mayawati government slapped charges under the Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA) against him, but in 2003, within minutes of the Mulayam Singh Yadav taking over as the Chief Minister, all charges against him were dropped.last_img read more

Does Mimas have an ocean under an icy cap?

first_imgYou’ll forgive Mimas, one of Saturn’s smaller ice moons, for seeming a little dull. It doesn’t have the obvious enticements of its siblings, such as Enceladus, with its water-spewing fissures, or Titan, with its thick methane atmosphere. Studies of Mimas, thought to be geologically dead, have been few and far between. “We thought it was the most boring satellite,” says Radwan Tajeddine, a planetary scientist at Cornell University.But the moon may hold a special secret of its own. A stronger than expected rotational wobble points to one of two intriguing scenarios: Mimas either has an irregularly shaped core or has an ocean buried underneath its icy surface. “Something else has to be going on inside,” says Tajeddine, who publishes a study with his colleagues online today in Science. Other scientists say it’s unlikely Mimas has such an interesting interior and think the wobble can be explained more simply.Tajeddine and his team relied on pictures taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which has been exploring the Saturn system since 2004. They built a 3D model of the moon and found that it rotates with an extra wobble, like a misshapen top spinning slightly askew. Because Mimas is nearly spherical, the wobble hinted that something lumpy, or perhaps sloshy, lay beneath the surface. The scientists tested several models of the moon’s interior to see what might give rise to the observed wobble.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In the end, just two scenarios could reproduce it. In one, a spherical shell of ice wraps around an irregular rocky core shaped like a rugby ball. If this scenario holds, Tajeddine says, the “fossilized” core could hold clues to Mimas’s formation. He says the core could have acquired an irregular shape by forming first, much closer to Saturn, where the planet’s strong tides could have stretched it. Then, the core could have migrated outward and accumulated ice, which, being more deformable, would settle into a sphere. But there still should have been a small sign of the irregular core protruding at the surface, like an elbow poking up against a sleeve, and the researchers found none.That led them to favor the other scenario: an ocean underneath an ice cap 24 to 31 kilometers thick. If it is true, Mimas would join Enceladus, Titan, and Jupiter’s moons Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto as solar system moons suspected to harbor an ocean. One problem is that Mimas’s ancient, heavily cratered surface shows no signs that water has ever touched it—unlike, say, the freshly Zamboni-ed ice skating rink of Europa. Mimas is also too small to have enough heat-producing radioactive elements in a rocky core to maintain a liquid ocean. But Tajeddine says the gravitational tug of Saturn on Mimas’s eccentric orbit could produce enough tidal heating to maintain a liquid interior.But not for very long, says William McKinnon, a planetary scientist at Washington University in St. Louis. If such an ocean were buried there, its tides would iron out Mimas’s orbital eccentricity within a few million years—eliminating the very thing that can keep the ocean liquid. That means that Cassini would have to be catching Mimas at an incredibly coincidental moment in its history, just after something put the moon into an eccentric orbit that in turn heated up and created the ocean. “I find it quite implausible,” McKinnon says. He says the rugby ball–shaped core scenario is more compelling, though that same result could be achieved with irregular gradations in the density of rock, ice, and pore space. He also suggests a scenario that the researchers did not consider, one in which the detected wobble could have been knocked into existence by something that has nothing to do with the moon’s interior: a comet impact.Cassini made its closest pass to Mimas in 2010, when it flew within 10,000 kilometers of the moon. As part of its extended mission, the spacecraft in 2016 will fly within about 27,000 kilometers of the moon, the closest of a handful of encounters in 2016 and 2017 that could allow Tajeddine to refine his measurements of the wobble. However, these passes will not be close enough for the spacecraft to look for tiny variations in the moon’s gravity field or surface temperature—two methods that would help reveal what really lies within.last_img read more

NIH scientists lead presidential show-and-tell

first_imgBETHESDA, MARYLAND—Anthony Fauci remembers the last time he played tour guide to the president. In 2009, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) walked the newly inaugurated Barack Obama around the campus here, in what he calls a “getting-to-know-you-type visit.” Yesterday, Fauci hosted a second tour by Obama, but, against the backdrop of the global Ebola crisis; “this one has a specific purpose,” he says.Obama’s purpose was equal parts celebration and exhortation. In remarks at the NIH Clinical Center, he congratulated NIH teams that have conducted basic research on the virus; cared for the Dallas, Texas, nurse Nina Pham when she was diagnosed in October; and worked on the vaccine candidate jointly developed with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), for which initial safety results were published last week in The New England Journal of Medicine. He touted a new White House announcement about improvements in U.S. Ebola preparedness. And he won laughs from the audience of scientists by tiptoeing through a jargon-filled sentence describing their work. (When he reached the phrase “multiparameter flow cytometer,” the crowd burst into applause.)But the visit also comes as the White House awaits action from Congress on a nearly $6.2 billion emergency appropriations request to continue fighting the virus in West Africa and to move candidate vaccines through clinical trials. The request, made on 12 November, allots $238 million to NIH. Fauci says $56 million of the total would go toward a larger efficacy trial in Liberia, which would include both the NIAID/GSK vaccine and another made by NewLink Genetics of Ames, Iowa (pending more data from ongoing safety trials).Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Obama acknowledged that amid news of progress against the outbreak in Liberia, U.S. media attention to the crises has waned. “That’s sort of how our attention spans work sometimes. Ebola’s not leading the news right now,” he said. He urged Congress to approve the emergency request before leaving for the holidays, noting that his conversations with lawmakers have been encouraging. But as Congress struggles to reach a compromise on federal spending before adjourning later this month, it’s uncertain whether the Ebola request will be approved in its entirety.After the speech, Clifford Lane, NIAID’s deputy clinical director responsible for the framework of the anticipated study, told ScienceInsider that the final emergency funding level will determine “how many things we might have to compromise” to conduct the new trial. He says he’s hopeful that the study will begin in January.As the president made his way through the labs in the NIAID Vaccine Research Center, Nancy Sullivan, who heads the center’s biodefense research section, offered to show him the original lab book from her 1999 experiments involving Ebola. The results, published the following year in Nature, were the first step in what would become the NIAID/GSK vaccine. The president was transfixed by the notebook, Fauci says. He brought it up in his speech that afternoon, as evidence of the many years of quiet, incremental research now culminating—under a global spotlight—in a potential vaccine. “When she first had some breakthroughs in understanding the Ebola virus, nobody really gave a hoot,” Obama said. “Until you do.”*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicinehave made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public.last_img read more

PBA D-League: San Sebastian stays unbeaten, keeps NU winless

first_img“You can’t ask for more. He was tired but you can still see his effort,” said San Sebastian coach Egay Macaraya of Ilagan.True enough, Ilagan, who went 6-of-11 from long range, also contributed in other ways other than scoring with three rebounds, four assists and three steals.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesAllyn Bulanadi added 14 points, nine rebounds, four assists and five steals for the Golden Harvest.Dave Ildefonso had 21 points, four rebounds and six assists for NU, which fell to 0-3. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem Hong Kong tunnel reopens, campus siege nears end View comments P2.5 B shabu seized in Makati sting, Chinese national nabbed SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Trump campaign, GOP groups attack Google’s new ad policy LATEST STORIES LaMarcus Aldridge, DeMar DeRozan help Spurs rally past Bucks Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Urgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief MOST READ Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss PBA IMAGESRK Ilagan carried much of the offensive load and Valencia City Bukidnon-San Sebastian downed SMDC-National University, 82-73, in the 2019 PBA D-League Monday at Paco Arena in Manila.Ilagan fired 14 of his 30 points in the fourth quarter as the Golden Harvest upped their unbeaten record to 3-0 to pace the Foundation Group.ADVERTISEMENT 1 dead, 3 injured in Quezon road crashlast_img read more

Claw foot

first_imgClaw toe is a deformity of the foot in which the toes are pointed down and the arch is high, making the foot appear claw-like. Claw toe can be a condition from birth or develop as a consequence from other disorders.Review Date:1/17/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wanglast_img

Golfer Anirban Lahiri to endorse tech firm Smartron

first_img× null golf COMMENTS cricket SHARE SHARE SHARE EMAIL Published on January 05, 2018 sport After Sachin Tendulkar, technology firm Smartron has added ace Indian golfer Anirban Lahiri to give it a sporty edge in the competitive market. Anirban will endorse the brand on a five-year contract on the global stage. In return Smartron, the global OEM and IoT brand, will be the main sponsors involving Anirban and will support his journey on the global stage.Sachin Tendulkar has been involved with the company as its brand ambassador and strategic shareholder from its early days. With this association, Smartron wants to bring alive on the global stage Indian stories from all walks of life. It wants to put India on the innovation map of the world through its powered tronX platform and ecosystem, said an official press release.Lahiri has been making waves with his performances. The Arjuna awardee is the highest ranked Indian golfer in the world, and was no 75 in the PGA Championship in 2017. He has 20 professional wins to his credit.Commenting on the partnership, Mahesh Lingareddy, Founder and Chairman of the company said, Anirban has gained a lot of popularity outside India as well in the US and Europe, and makes a strong fit with Smartron’s brand promise of an Indian technology company with global ambitions. COMMENT IT-enabled serviceslast_img read more

IPL 2016: Injured Ashish Nehra to miss couple of games, says David Warner

first_imgSunrisers Hyderabad captain David Warner confirmed that Ashish Nehra will miss out on couple of games due to a groin injury he suffered during the match against Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) on Tuesday.”Nehra has hurt his groin. He will be out for a couple of games,” said Warner after his side’s 45-run loss to RCB.It was Nehra’s first game for the Sunrisers, having joined the team from Chennai Super Kings. He limped off the field after bowling 2.1 overs in which he conceded 21 runs. (Full Indian Premier League 2016 coverage )”We have to look back and look at positives and turn it around. We have a good batting track at Hyderabad. We should not lose wickets in clumps,” added Warner.RCB captain Virat Kohli, who struck 75 off 51 balls and shared a 157-run stand with man of the match AB de Villiers (82 off 42), was all praise for the South African.”We lost the toss and did not get what we wanted to. It was a really good effort from the batsman and Parvez showed composure. It is never easy for the spinners to bowl in Bangalore. Parvez was the stand-out bowler for me today. Last year, me and AB had a good partnership in Mumbai. He hit balls as only he can. It was a pleasure playing with him. He took some pressure off me,” said Kohli.(with PTI inputs)last_img read more

Sense of belonging can make you happier: study

first_imgLondon, May 22 (PTI) People who feel a strong sense of belonging to social groups are much happier than those who do not, a new study has found.Researchers studied the extent to which almost 4,000 participants felt connected to certain groups, and then measured the impact this had upon their levels of happiness.The study found that the more an individual identified with a particular group, the more happy they were with their life.With each additional group that people connected with, their happiness increased by nine per cent, researchers found.”Our findings suggest that thinking more about ones group life could have significant benefits for an overall sense of wellbeing,” said Juliet Wakefield from Nottingham Trent University in the UK.The levels by which participants identified with their family, local community, and a group of their choice – such as sports, hobby or religious groups – were measured via psychological scales following detailed questionnaires, along with their general happiness levels.Researchers believe that the effect could be the result of group identification providing individuals with a stronger sense of purpose and security, as well crucial social support during times of stress and crisis.”We tend to identify with groups that share our values, interests and life priorities, as well as those that support us in times of crisis, and we can see how this would link to happiness,” said Wakefield.”It is important to note that identifying with a group is not the same as membership, though. You can be a member of a group with which you feel no connection at all,” she said.advertisement”It is that subjective sense of belonging that is crucial for happiness,” she added.Researchers found that the relationship between group identification and happiness remained even after they took into account participant gender, age, employment status, nationality and the extent of their contact with each group.The findings were published in the Journal of Happiness Studies. PTI SAN SAR SARlast_img read more

AZ beat PAS Giannina

first_imgALKMAAR- AZ have beaten Greek side PAS Giannina in the first official match of the season on Thursday: 1-0. In the AFAS Stadium Derrick Luckassen decided the match in the third qualifying round of the Europa League with a first half header.Lineup AZ: Sergio Rochet; Mattias Johansson, Derrick Luckassen, Ron Vlaar, Ridgeciano Haps; Markus Henriksen, Joris van Overeem (87. Mats Seuntjens), Stijn Wuytens; Alireza Jahanbakhsh (63. Levi Garcia), Wout Weghorst (63. Fred Friday), Dabney dos Santos.Lineup PAS Giannina: Alexandros Paschalakis; Nikos Karanikas, Themis Tzimopoulos, Theodoros Berios, Alexios Michail, Martin Lopez; Chrysovalantis Kozoronis (61. Leonardo Koutris), Andi Lila, Noé Acosta; Evripidis Giakos (74. Christos Donis), Dimitris Ferfelis (50. Christopher Maboulou).TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

9 months agoCrystal Palace down to single senior keeper for Liverpool clash

first_imgCrystal Palace down to single senior keeper for Liverpool clashby Freddie Taylor9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCrystal Palace are facing a goalkeeper crisis ahead of Saturday’s clash with Liverpool.With goalkeepers Vicente Guaita and Wayne Hennessey both injured, manager Roy Hodgson is set to hand Julian Speroni his first appearance since December 2017.Both Guaita and Hennessey were injured in last Saturday’s loss to Watford.They are both expected to miss a month of action, leaving Speroni as the only fit senior goalkeeperat Selhurst Park. About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Need a Craft Cocktail Getaway? Head to Salt Plage on St. Kitts

first_img 6 Cocktail Trends You Need to Watch, According to Tales of the Cocktail Experts Should Bars Be Kid and Dog-Friendly? We Asked the Experts For most of us, it’s cold right now. For some of us, it’s really, really cold (tongue stuck to a flagpole cold).It’s a time when sun-warmed sand and fresh, tropical cocktails are not just appealing, but you might consider selling a limb for them. It’d be one thing to just head south and go to any island in the Caribbean, but what about when you want a well-made, well thought-out cocktail? Well, we have the answer and we think you’re going to like it.Located on the island of St. Kitts (which has an average temperature in December of 82 degrees Fahrenheit), Salt Plage at Christophe Harbour, is your one-stop shop for all things, fun, sun, and alcohol.Headed by Christian Zamora, Salt Plage is one of the best beach-side bars in the world by Condé Nast, and for good reason. You see, Zamora and his team at Salt Plage has done what has been previously unknown on the island of St. Kitts—they’ve created a craft cocktail program.“Craft cocktails is a new thing here and I feel very privileged to bring this to the island for perhaps the first time. I think Christophe Harbour and I share a great responsibility bringing craft cocktails to the island,” Zamora said of the task before them.Part of what makes the craft cocktail menu at Salt Plage work, according to Zamora, is that they utilize local ingredients to bring fresh colors and flavors to their drinks. Ingredients like soursop, sorrel, and a bark that goes by the name mauby (which, according to Zamora tastes like a peaty root beer), have all found their way into drinks on the menu.“Using things like mauby is very unusual. Kittitians are really into unique non-alcoholic drinks but the idea of using those elixirs in a cocktail isn’t really a thing, it seems,” Zamora said.By using those ingredients that were previously not thought of as cocktail-ready, he’s seen the locals that visit the bar engaged in their drinks, wanting to learn more about the process, the ingredients, everything.  “Sometimes, people that come in bring me ingredients—like a wax apple, for example—and it allows me to learn about something new and see how I can use it,” he added.Where the team at Salt Plage stands out, though, is working to make sure too many ingredients don’t muddle the overall product. With so many colors and flavors, it’d be easy to want to add them all. You can’t do that, though, according to Zamora.“If you throw a bunch of colors in a pot, it’ll turn brown. It’s the same with cocktails. Our goal is to take care with the drinks so that doesn’t happen.”Another way the cocktail program has seen success, Zamora said, is by embracing what already works on the island. For example, two-part drinks like a vodka soda or a gin & tonic are big, because there’s a reputation for drinks to take a long time to come out.“If you order a Manhattan and there’s nobody else in the bar, it still may take ten minutes,” Zamora said. “There’s a saying here for stuff like that, ‘Rush slowly.’”With that in mind, Zamora worked to create drinks that embrace that idea while pushing the flavors to new heights. The Mauby Mule—a take on the Dark & Stormy that utilizes the local mauby bark—is just one example.A third area that Zamora said has been an interesting challenge is the realm of frozen drinks.“The connotation of frozen cocktails is interesting out here. There’s a stigma against them to many,” he said.Instead of ignoring them, as it would be easy to do, again Zamora embraced them, channeling the classic Caribbean cocktail the Painkiller to create the Jumbie, a frozen drink that has quickly become one of the staples on the menu.Zamora’s thoughts on the matter are simple: “Rather than fight the idea, how can I make this better. How can I make it the the freshest, the best that this person has ever had?”To add to the level of care and craft for their cocktails, the team at Salt Plage is now hand-squeezing all of their juices for cocktails. They are also the only bar in the country to offer Mezcal, Fernet Branca, Green Chartreuse, bitters other than Angostura, Rye Whiskey, Aperol, Averna, and Cynar. Basically, whatever your wish for a craft cocktail is, Salt Plage will have you covered. Not only that, but you’ll be able to do it while getting a tan and listening to the waves. What more could you ask for? The Most Refreshing Sparkling Waters to Sip On Right Now Stirred or Shaken? How to Make a Perfect Vodka Martini Editors’ Recommendations Rum 101: An Introduction to the Different Types of Rum and How They’re Madelast_img read more

GAIL Seeking to Renew LNG Deal with Iran

first_imgzoom India’s gas utility company GAIL is seeking to revive an LNG deal with Iran dating back from 2005 as steps on lifting of sanctions against Iran gain momentum.The agreement relates to a $ 22-billion LNG supply contract signed with National Iranian Gas Export Company (NIGEC) for the purchase of 5 million tonnes a year of LNG at a $3.215 per million British thermal unit.“Dialogue has been initiated with Iranian counterparts to revive the LNG supply longterm SPA,” the Economic Times writes citing GAIL’s business results.As informed, Iran has not yet officially responded to GAIL’s approaches and would need to first complete its LNG terminal under development at Tombak Port, before it moves ahead with the deal.The Bombay Stock Exchange informed today that it has also sought clarification from Gail (India) Ltd with respect to the talks and said it was still waiting a reply.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Ocean Yield Bolsters Drybulk Fleet with Five Handysizes

first_imgzoom Ocean Yield ASA has decided to buy five Handysize dry bulkers with 10-year bareboat charters to companies owned and guaranteed by Interlink Maritime Corp, owner and provider of dry bulkers to agricultural and industrial commodities companies, and other end-users.The purchase price is approximately USD 75 million net of pre-paid charter hire, the Norwegian shipowner said.One vessel will be delivered from the shipyard in April 2018, while three of the vessels are built in 2015 and one in 2014.The transaction is subject to final agreement on documentation. ” In our opinion the timing for making new investments in shipping is excellent and we remain committed to continuing to increase and further diversify our portfolio of modern vessels on long-term charter in order to support attractive dividends to our shareholders,” Ocean Yield ASA’s Chief Executive Officer Lars Solbakken said.Interlink Maritime will have certain options to acquire the vessels during the charter period, with the first purchase option exercisable after five years in addition to an obligation to repurchase the vessels at the end of year ten.Interlink Maritime owns a fleet of 28 Handysize vessels, including three newbuildings. The company is majority-owned by the Carlyle Group, which is a global alternative asset manager with USD 174 billion of assets under management across 306 investment vehicles.Ocean Yield’s latest purchase comes on the back of an investment in two 2018-built handysize dry bulk vessels with 12-year bareboat charters earlier this month which marked the company’s entrance in the dry bulk sector.The bulkers will be chartered to companies owned and guaranteed by French maritime firm Louis Dreyfus Armateurs Group (LDA).According to Solbakken, the company sees potential for more transactions in the sector especially in the wake of improved earnings in the dry bulk market.last_img read more

Aerialist daredevil hangs by teeth from chopper over Niagara Falls

first_imgNIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. – A trapeze artist from a renowned family of daredevils hung by her teeth Thursday as a helicopter carried her above the thunder of Niagara Falls in a stunt that grabbed international attention.As people on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border craned their necks to catch a glimpse, aerialist Erendira Vasquez Wallenda performed a series of movements on a hoop suspended from the chopper, including hanging from her knees and toes — and twice from her teeth.“There are no words; it was beautiful,” Wallenda said moments after returning to the ground. “It felt amazing.”Wallenda, 36, performed her feat five years after her stuntman husband, Nik Wallenda, walked 550 metres on a tightrope from the American side of the falls to the Canadian side.Tethered to a safety harness as legally required, Erendira Vasquez Wallenda said the wind above the falls was far more fierce than she had expected, prompting the pilot to nose the chopper a little higher.As someone who has performed since she was five years old, she said she wasn’t nervous.“I know my limits. I would never do anything — I know this sounds silly — that I know would possibly hurt me.”Wallenda said she hoped her performance would inspire others — and she offered a special message for other females.“If a guy can do it, a girl can do it, too,” she said. “We just do it with a little more grace.”Wallenda spent about eight minutes of her 10-minute stunt hovering over the falls. While the plan was to hang from her teeth only once for about 15 seconds, she said she felt so good that she opted to repeat the move for about 10 seconds.The falls, a site that has attracted and inspired daredevils for generations, has a certain mystical pull, Wallenda said after her performance. Watching her husband five years ago made her want to do something as well.“As an artist and a daredevil I guess, there is something about it, something almost magical that draws you to it,” she said.Some observers who watched Wallenda’s stunt from the ground called it an exciting event.“It was pretty impressive,” said Marty Newcomen, who was visiting the area from Calgary and watched the stunt from the Canadian side of the falls. “You could see she was making a few moves up there, definitely, changing positions, going horizontal, putting her legs out.”Janet Dooley, a tourist from California, added that a stunt like Wallenda’s would make for “a nice yearly event.”Nik Wallenda said his dream was to open a permanent family-friendly facility on the U.S. side of the falls where people could learn to perform stunts in safety.In the interim, he said, he hoped more people would come visit the area as a result of the publicity afforded his wife’s stunt.“The global attention is huge. It’s like a worldwide TV commercial.”last_img read more

Lowerthanexpected parcel volumes helping cut into backlog says Canada Post

first_imgOTTAWA — With a little over a week before Christmas, Canada Post says it is starting to catch up on parcel deliveries that have been delayed by rotating strikes over the past two months.The Crown corporation says that’s largely because it is taking in fewer holiday parcels than expected.At the same time, however, the agency says it cannot restore its delivery guarantees because backlogs remain sporadic across the country.Canada Post says volumes of international deliveries are also significantly less than expected, allowing postal workers to make some progress in reducing backlogs of packages from foreign locations.The corporation requested in mid-November that its international partners stop sending packages to Canada while work stoppages were held in cities across the country.Those international carriers resumed shipments Nov. 27 after the federal government passed back-to-work legislation, forcing an end to the rotating walkouts.“The international volumes now entering the country are significantly less than expected,” Canada Post said in a statement. “Processing lower incoming volumes, combined with the time lag for items to arrive in Canada, has helped us make some progress this week.”Letter mail deliveries, meanwhile, are “current,” the corporation said, meaning that Christmas cards and other mail are expected to be delivered under normal timeframes.Canada Post said its employees are being offered voluntary overtime.As well, the agency said it has hired nearly 4,000 additional seasonal employees and bolstered its delivery fleet with almost 2,000 additional vehicles.The federal government appointed mediator Elizabeth MacPherson earlier this week to try to negotiate contract settlements between Canada Post and the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, which represents about 50,000 postal employees.The two sides sat down to their first meeting with MacPherson on Wednesday. She has until Monday to bring both sides to a deal, although that deadline can be extended by another week.If no agreements are reached, the former chair of the Canada Industrial Relations Board also has been given authority to begin a binding arbitration process in January.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Ontario pot retailers who failed to open stores by April 15 face

TORONTO — Cannabis retailers in Ontario who have failed to open their stores by a government-set deadline are facing a new round of financial penalties.In all, eleven pot retailers have been fined $12,500 each for not opening their stores by April 15.Twenty-five retailers were selected through a government lottery to open the first brick-and-mortar cannabis stores on April 1, but less than half met the deadline.The Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario established a system of escalating penalties for retailers who didn’t start serving customers on time.The agency says it has drawn down on letters of credit submitted by the licencees — some for a second time — taking $12,500 from the $50,000 initially provided.Stores that do not open by the end of the month could have further penalties. There are currently 13 cannabis shops operating across the province.The Canadian Press read more

No progress in Lebanon over Hariri tribunal ratification – UN legal chief

2 May 2007Lebanon’s key political forces have made no progress in ending their deadlock over the ratification of a planned special tribunal to try the suspected killers of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, the United Nations Legal Counsel said today after briefing the Security Council on his recent visit to the country. Nicolas Michel, who is also Under-Secretary-General for Legal Affairs, told journalists that during his meetings in Beirut he was unable to persuade Lebanon’s major political figures – who have all expressed strong support in principle for the tribunal – to settle their differences.The Government, headed by Prime Minister Fuad Siniora, and the opposition have been in dispute for some months over the current composition of the Government, and Mr. Michel said that for many opposition figures a resolution of that issue was a precondition for ending the deadlock on the tribunal.“I can simply say that, for now, from all the discussions that I had, from all the efforts that I attempted, I see no progress,” he said, stressing that his mandate was very specific and did not include Lebanon’s internal politics or canvassing alternatives to the tribunal.Earlier, Mr. Michel briefed Council members on his visit to Lebanon late last month, where he met with a series of interlocutors, including Mr. Siniora, President Emile Lahoud and Speaker of the Parliament Nabih Berri.Mr. Michel was dispatched to Beirut by Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to offer legal assistance to the Lebanese as they work towards parliamentary ratification of the agreement on setting up the tribunal, a necessary step for the tribunal to enter into force. Yet Lebanon’s parliamentary forces have been deadlocked on the issue and there has been no vote.The planned tribunal will be of “an international character” to deal with the assassination of Mr. Hariri, who was killed along with 22 others in a massive car bombing in downtown Beirut in February 2005. Once it is formally established, it will be up to the tribunal to determine whether other political killings in Lebanon since October 2004 were connected to Mr. Hariri’s assassination and could therefore be dealt with by the tribunal. In April 2005 the Security Council set up the International Independent Investigation Commission (IIIC) after an earlier UN mission found that Lebanon’s own inquiry into the Hariri assassination was seriously flawed and that Syria was primarily responsible for the political tensions that preceded the attack. Its mandate runs out next year. Serge Brammertz, the current IIIC head, told the Council last September that evidence obtained so far suggests that a young, male suicide bomber, probably non-Lebanese, detonated up to 1,800 kilograms of explosives inside a van to assassinate Mr. Hariri.Meanwhile, senior officials from the UN Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), the Lebanese Armed Forces and the Israeli Defence Forces (IDF) held a tripartite meeting today to discuss the implementation of the Security Council resolution last year that ended the 34-day war between the IDF and Hizbollah.The focus of today’s meeting, attended by UNIFIL Force Commander Maj.-Gen. Claudio Graziano, was on the full respect of the Blue Line and the strict adherence of all sides to the cessation of hostilities agreement.“The meeting was a productive one and I am pleased with the progress made,” Maj.-Gen. Graziano said, according to a statement released by UNIFIL. “The constructive attitude shown by the parties augurs well for the future, and will help to maintain the cessation of hostilities, as well as ensure respect of the Blue Line.” read more

UN rushes aid to help Indonesians stricken by floods and landslides

3 January 2008United Nations agencies have been rushing aid to Indonesians on the southern island of Java, which was recently struck by severe floods and landslides. Seasonal torrential rains have impacted central and eastern Java, resulting in over 90 deaths, according to the Indonesian Government. Additionally, more than 30 people are missing. With a rapid assessment pointing to clean water and sanitation as the priority needs, the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is supplying hygiene kits, water purification supplies and water storage equipment to fulfil the daily water requirements of 10,000 people in central Java. The UN Population Fund (UNFPA) has provided assistance for pregnant women, babies and women who have just delivered, while the UN World Food Programme (WFP) has conducted assessments and is preparing for possible food-for-work programmes. Meanwhile, the UN Development Programme (UNDP) will provide support to the Indonesian Government, the UN Resident Coordinator and UN Humanitarian Coordinator. read more

Ohio State baseball player diagnosed with leukemia set to miss rest of

Freshman pitcher Zach Farmer, throws a pitch. OSU won against Toledo, 7-2, April 2.Credit: Elliot Schall / Lantern photographerOhio State freshman pitcher Zach Farmer will miss the remainder of the 2014 season after being diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia this week.According to the National Cancer Institute, acute myeloid leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the blood and bone marrow.“I met with Zach this morning and he is in good spirits in the company of family, friends and teammates,” OSU baseball coach Greg Beals said in a released statement Thursday. “Zach is strong, and otherwise healthy, and is a great candidate to beat this diagnosis.”Farmer is set to begin a treatment process Monday at the Wexner Medical Center James Comprehensive Cancer Center. He and his family found out about the illness earlier this week, and the rest of the team was notified Tuesday before its trip to Louisville, Ky., for a game against Louisville Wednesday.OSU lost that game, 7-3.Farmer appeared in 10 games this season for the Buckeyes and had a 6-4 record to go along with a 3.28 ERA. He was second to senior pitcher Greg Greve with nine starts this season, while Greve has made 11 starts.“The team as a whole is obviously concerned about their brother, but we will forge on in our mission,” Beals said.OSU (25-20, 6-9) is scheduled to take on the Iowa Hawkeyes (25-15, 7-8) Saturday at Bill Davis Stadium. First pitch is set for 3:05 p.m. read more

Balancing the budget – the ancient Greek perspective

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Is democracy good for balancing a budget? For many, today, the answer is a resonating no. This answer is easy to understand. In the birthplace of democracy, Greece, the state’s budget is a mess. For too long the politicians of modern Athens feared that voters would not tolerate the financial truth. To pay for unaffordable election promises they borrowed irresponsibly instead of raising taxes. They lied to voters about the ballooning public debt. It all ended, of course, in a huge sovereign-debt crisis. Even in the midst of this crisis Greek politicians were afraid to tell voters how the country could escape it. They left it to Greece’s creditors to dictate harsh austerity-policies. These policies have caused enormous personal suffering. Greek voters did not vote for them. Not without reason they are incredibly angry with their politicians. Greece’s crisis might be exceptionally severe. But the problem behind it is not unique to Greek democracy. To name two other modern democracies, Australia and Britain were forced to take drastic budget measures in response to the global financial crisis. In each democracy centre-left politicians borrowed heavily to pay to prop up their banks and to maintain private demand. In each country these expansionary policies minimised the crisis’s human impact. But in the elections that followed the left of centre politicians that had introduced these policies refused properly to justify them. They feared that voters would not tolerate frank public debate about public finances. The centre-right politicians who opposed them were no better. In these elections they promised to bring budgets back into surplus without new taxes or major public-sector cuts. But these promises again turned out to be lies. In office these conservative politicians have introduced austerity policies without clear electoral mandates. They too continue to face the wrath of their electorates. For good reasons the voters of Australia and Britain have lost a lot of trust in what politicians say about public finances.In all these democracies there has been a common underlying problem. Politicians do not believe that voters can tolerate the financial truth. They assume that democracy is not good at managing public finances. For them it can only balance the budget by leaving voters in the dark. As a historian of ancient Greek democracy this assumption strikes me as plainly wrong. Certainly the politicians of ancient Athens did not share it. Ancient Athens was an incredibly successful state. It developed democracy to a higher level than any other state before the modern period. It was the leading cultural innovator of its age. Ancient Athens became one of the ancient world’s greatest military powers. These successes did not come cheaply. They depended on Athenian democracy’s ability to raise new taxes and to control public spending. What made these successes possible was the sound management of public finances. That the democracy of ancient Athens was good at this will come as a surprise. Germans have been critical of Greek public spending for a very long time. In 1817 August Böckh famously criticised ancient Athens for spending more on public sector pay and cultural festivals than on its armed forces. For this German professor this wasteful spending weakened ancient Athens’ armed forces. It made it possible for Greece to be conquered by Macedonia. This German criticism proved to be immensely influential. But in the two centuries after Böckh a lot of Athenian democracy’s financial accounts have come to light. Today we can now see that Böckh got his sums wrong. In times of war Athenian voters agreed to spend fifteen times more on its armed forces than they did on state pay or festivals. In times of peace what they spent on the state’s security still dwarfed all other public spending combined. Athenian voters thus regularly voted to put the collective good ahead of their personal financial interests. Athenian democracy required frank discussions about this public spending. This requirement lay at the heart of its surprising success at balancing budgets. In this direct democracy assemblygoers voted for or against each policy. The Athenian assembly met forty times per year. Twenty per cent of voters always turned up. Athenian voters expected a politician who supported a policy accurately to estimate its cost. He had to demonstrate whether the state could afford it. Often he faced the counter arguments of rival politicians that it was unaffordable. In response he would have to say how his policy’s cost could be reduced or a new tax introduced to pay for it. From ancient Athens today’s politicians can draw three vitally important lessons. Firstly, rigorous public debate is essential. In Athenian democracy such frank discussion weeded out unaffordable policies. It laid the ground work for the tax increases that were needed to fund other policies.Modern politicians, secondly, should not fear telling voters the financial truth. Involving voters in public finance debates actually helps to build consensus for tough reforms. Athenian voters did not punish politicians for higher taxes, because they were clearly the ones that had voted for them in the first place. Thirdly, and most importantly, ancient Greek democracy was surprisingly good at successfully resolving budgetary crises. As long as our politicians are brave enough to speak candidly about public finances, there is no reason why modern democracies cannot do the same. Dr David M. Pritchard is a historian of ancient history at the University of Queensland and the author of Public Spending and Democracy in Classical Athens.last_img read more